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can somebody out there please explain the mexican made sax stigma to me ? i own and play a nogales made shooting stars tenor and am both happy with the build quality /tone/action ! so therefore i don,t get this mexiconn stigma ?
all replies welcome good or bad or even bad bad !
cheers
bernie
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2007-
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Some Mexiconns I've seen and dealt with seemed just as well made, or almost as well made, as their Elkhart predecessors. Other Mexiconns were pure trash with easily bent metal, terrible tone and limiting intonation problems.

I think it all depends on which model you are talking about and when it was made. Like a lot of things from the 1970's, the Mexiconns probably run the entire spectrum between great and terrible.
 

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The story is that there's more inconsistency. I don't know if that's true or false. Many mexiconns are perfectly good horns.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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can somebody out there please explain the mexican made sax stigma to me ?
mexican made sax stigma? Phooey. What about the "It isn't MKVI" stigma.

Some great, really great, Conns were made in Mexico. Just enjoy it.
 

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If your horn was made in Nogales AZ as you have suggested, then it is not a Mexi-Conn. Mexi-Conns are marked Mexico, and made at an entirely different facility.

The reputation for shoddy workmanship and indifferent quality control among the latter, 1970's incarnation of the Director model is largely well deserved, and definitely not representative of Conn's glory days.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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the latter, 1970's incarnation of the Director model is largely well deserved, and definitely not representative of Conn's glory days.
This is certainly true, the build is not as good but many of them still have that sound and response, though I must admit my experience may not be as comprehensive re: mexican Conns as Saxismyaxe's.
 

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Basically, those w/knowledge of 'em are gonna say the same thing (they already have, above). Some MX-made ones are fabulous...some are respectable...and some are very problematic.

....generally I agree that the older they are (pre-70's) the better they seemed to be...although I just got a pair of "N" serialed ones (1970) in, which I am working up and they seemed quite decent even before I took it to 'em.

I think there IS a stigma...I can digress this thread into a socio-cultural-political discussion, but will not do that.

Suffice to say, it's a big bunch of bad information which connects a bunch of words to one another: Mexico...Nogales...Shooting Star.... 'post-1960'....'late model'....and has given all of those words negative connotations.

Which is too bad for the reputation...but..can be good for a buyer if they do a bit of homework.
 

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Because not every Director Model Sax that came out of Mexico was the same when it came to quality. Before the move there was apparently better quality control. If you're happy with your sax, then be happy with it, and remind people asking that not every sax that was made there is bad, but that there were some that were good and others that weren't so good and that you should always try it before you buy it.
 

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"can somebody out there please explain the mexican made sax stigma to me ?"

My tech was not happy with a few of the longer rods on my Mexico 16M. He said they were the wrong size (too thin) and made the action slack. He replaced those rods to tighten the thing up. It works great now, and the fix did not cost much. In addition, the horn has some ugly - the flux attaching the bow was allowed to run and was then finished over it without cleaning it up. Solid attachment there, but not fine craftsmanship. I suspect that materials might have been used as available and quality control was spotty. That is the impression I get from reading about them here. I paid only $100 for mine, figuring the excellent case was worth something, even if the horn was a bust. As it is, the horn goes all out with an STM, wailing. No complaints.
 

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I practically stole a 1970 N-serialed baritone for $700 a few years back (and it came with a Ponzol M2 which I sold). Very solid horn, especially for the tiny bit of money!
 
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