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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
In my current ebay listing ;
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...MESE:IT&viewitem=&item=220089271733&rd=1&rd=1

A question / comment was posted that my sax is a rare "Metro" model. I've not seen of such a thing have you?

"I believe this is one of the rare Metro models made for a few select NY jazz professionals such as Johnny Hodges. The neck was preferred for having more of a NY sound. I have a horn of the same vintage."
 

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Nice horn and rare in the fact it has a new yorker neck instead of a micro-tuner but i haven't heard of a metro model but you learn something new everyday (and forget a few hundred things as well!!!!)
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dave dix said:
Nice horn and rare in the fact it has a new yorker neck instead of a micro-tuner but i haven't heard of a metro model but you learn something new everyday (and forget a few hundred things as well!!!!)
Dave
So I guess the NY neck is the same thing?
 

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I owned a Metro model 6M, it has this style of neck and the word Metro was stamped on the horn somewhere. Of the dozens of conn altos I have played this one (post Les Arbuckle overhaul) was the single loudest and most powerful of them all. Les agreed. I didn't care for the tone particularly and sold it to an experienced player who wrote me that he and all his sax buddies thought it was the loudest alto they had ever heard or played. He LOVED it!!

Although Conn themselves never used this particular appellation it nonetheless was adopted for general use by the public. The story I have heard is that the New York based players all ordered their 6M's sans microtuner and thus the name.
 

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"I believe this is one of the rare Metro models made for a few select NY jazz professionals such as Johnny Hodges. The neck was preferred for having more of a NY sound. I have a horn of the same vintage."
Interesting story, however everyone knows that after the late 1920's or so, Johnny Hodges switched to Bueschers, and played that brand for most of the rest of his career.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Kritavi said:
I owned a Metro model 6M, it has this style of neck and the word Metro was stamped on the horn somewhere. Of the dozens of conn altos I have played this one (post Les Arbuckle overhaul) was the single loudest and most powerful of them all. Les agreed. I didn't care for the tone particularly and sold it to an experienced player who wrote me that he and all his sax buddies thought it was the loudest alto they had ever heard or played. He LOVED it!!

Although Conn themselves never used this particular appellation it nonetheless was adopted for general use by the public. The story I have heard is that the New York based players all ordered their 6M's sans microtuner and thus the name.
I just looked over the horn and don't see any Metro stamp. Any idea where I should be looking for it?

It is a very loud alto if that means anything.
 

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I suspect that with your horn being around the cusp of the transitional era that it may not say Metro. I think it was up by the neck but I really can't remember for sure.
 

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Dear Sax is my Axe,

I have two photos in a book of swing-era photographs where Johnny Hodges in the early 30's is playing a 6M or Conn Tranny with the New York Style Neck.
 

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Conn offered this neck (which I'll call the "topside" neck) on 6Ms from 1932 to at least 1937 (most all trannys, altho I do own a 1937 6MVIII which has it). A different style of topside neck was offered on early Connqueror 26Ms.

It's not swappable with the underslung neck, because the octave systems on the horns are different. (The topside version is a lot simpler in design.)

What Conn didn't offer, at least not in their sales literature, was any choice (or any info at all) on the "M/Metro" or "N/National" necks. To this day nothing has come to light about the differences or the reason for the names. It doesn't seem to have anything to do with the type of octave lever, I don't think. I've seen various horns marked various ways or not marked at all.

The "Metro = New York" idea has possibilities, but as of now there's nothing to back it up - not even oral anecdote from anyone who was around then. I do have photos of the Jan Garber and Dick Jurgens reed sections using topside altos. Both bands were sweet music outfits based out of Chicago and definitely not striving for "New York tone."

Finally, I've seen one (and ONLY one) Conn tranny with a topside neck AND tuner. They'd make anything on order with payment upfront.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015, SOTW Better late than neve
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for your input Paul. So if I understand you correctly, since the necks are not interchangable, the topside neck would indicate a Metro model?
 

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Not necessarily. I've seen the topside neck marked all ways (M, N, and VIII) - and unmarked.

Previous 2 messages were double posts due to server hiccup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
paulwl said:
Not necessarily. I've seen the topside neck marked all ways (M, N, and VIII) - and unmarked.
Well, I'm in the unmarked catagory unless I'm not looking at the right place on the horn. It does have the "M" in the serial number.

:dontknow:
 

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M in the serial is STD for conn sax's , i would still call it a new yorker neck/ metro in the advert as the octave mechanism is correct
Dave
 

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saxismyaxe said:
Interesting story, however everyone knows that after the late 1920's or so, Johnny Hodges switched to Bueschers, and played that brand for most of the rest of his career.
Hodges played the Conn in the 40s. Switched to the Buescher in the early 50s. In the 60s he went to a custom one-off Vito. (two-off actually). Frank Wess ownes one of Rab's Vitos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Dave dix said:
M in the serial is STD for conn sax's , i would still call it a new yorker neck/ metro in the advert as the octave mechanism is correct
Dave
So what do ya' know??? I guess I have a diamond in the rough :D I wonder if some famous player originally ordered this. How rare are these?
 

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Paul, glad to see you back!
For a New Wonder horn, wouldn't a Pan-American neck be the same as a tunerless Conn neck?
 
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