Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 20 of 21 Posts

Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
43,582 Posts
we all went through this.....there is no way to tell which is the mouthpiece for you!

A metal mouthpiece, beside a sturdier construction which has natural protection from warping (it can happen , although rare, on HR, hard rubber, or on those rare wooden pieces). But it isn't necessarily better. Plenty of musicians used and are using metal and plenty used and are using HR.

A metal piece will be, in general terms, smaller, in its outer dimentions than a HR piece, hence a certain tendency to sound more acute (becaus your mouth will be less stretched outwards), all things being equal. Some mouthpieces are in their metal version the exact copy of the internal dimensions of a HR mouthpiece, yet sound different.

The key is trying yourself. Go to a shop in a major city and ask to playtest all they have to test, HR and Metal, then you will know what is the mouthpiece for you.

Yes Metal looks cooler!:cool: :)
 

Registered
Joined
196 Posts
it depends what style you play..........i would reccomend a metal mouthpiece for jazz or just for projection. its a big no if you are going to play classical with it.............but then again it will come down 2 preference on what sounds good for you............oh and if u buy a metal mouthpiece u should also try to find the right reeds for it (vandoren java is for jazz i believe)
 

Out of Office
Grafton + TH & C alto || Naked Lady 10M || TT soprano || Martin Comm III
Joined
30,061 Posts
DeUtCheaxelplaya said:
it depends what style you play..........i would reccomend a metal mouthpiece for jazz or just for projection.
I've never found that to be the case, HR mouthpieces can project just as much as metal, and are absolutely very good for jazz.

It is impossible to generalise about metal mouthpiececs, apart from maybe that mostly the external dimensions are smaller, but there is a world of difference in sound between say a Dukoff and a Link.

My advice to beginners is always to stick with a standard mouthpiece such as a Yamaha, Hite or Selmer (there are many more good ones, those are just ones I have enough experience of to recommend).
3 months is probably too soon to "upgrade", IMO you aren't ready until you are able to try mouthpieces out and make your own decisions.
 

Registered
Joined
155 Posts
After playing for three months I wouldn't recommend making a huge investment in a mouthpiece right now. I usually recommend my tenor students (when ready to go to a jazz piece) go with a HR link for affordability. Altos should check out a Meyer 5/6.

Mouthpieces can get really expensive, especially metal ones. Some can run upwards of 500 bones. After only three months of playing your embrouchure hasn't developed fully yet, and investing a large amount of money in a mouthpieces might prove a foolish move. Although I have seen rare evidence to the contrary. You can get a decent link for under 100 bucks if you know where to look, (although you should try several out with different openings). I myself recommend a 7* to most of my students as its what I find to be the most commonly used tip opening in mouthpieces. Once youve done a few thousand hours worth of long tones and overtones youll be more apt to make a decision on whats gonna work for you.
 

Forum Contributor 2007 Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
816 Posts
At 3 mos experience I wouldn't do it unless your mouthpiece is damaged or otherwise compromised and giving you trouble when playing basic stuff. If that is the case I would suggest getting a good inexpensive piece for now like a morgan protone or a rico, or a runyon. Keep the tip opening and baffle type modest. Don't get caught up in the "finding the perfect mouthpiece" game this early in your playing. A good basic mouthpiece will suffice for a couple years or more.

Also, if you do look for a new piece, concentrate on how easily it plays (blows) for you and not how it sounds. It's too early in your playing for that. A middle of the road setup will give you the most flexibility in developing your sound. Once you have established a direction for your playing (in a year or two), you can decide if a change in mouthpiece will help you acheive your desired goal in regards to sound.

I don't think material necessarily matters, I sound darker on my metal zagar than I did on my HR link. Not because of the material but because the Zagar is a bit more open and has little to no baffle.
 

Seeker Of A Clever Title.
Joined
3,795 Posts
DeUtCheaxelplaya said:
it depends what style you play..........i would reccomend a metal mouthpiece for jazz or just for projection. its a big no if you are going to play classical with it.............but then again it will come down 2 preference on what sounds good for you............oh and if u buy a metal mouthpiece u should also try to find the right reeds for it (vandoren java is for jazz i believe)
Mule played a metal C*
 

Registered
Joined
411 Posts
There are metal mpc's that are dark sounding , and there are HR mpcs that are bright and edgy. You just need to try a ton of them before you buy. Dont ever buy a mpc w/o playing it first. Today I played a Brillhart metal and a vandoren HR A35. The hard rubber was brighter and edgier than the metal. I was really suprised.
 

Registered
Joined
7,851 Posts
Material doesn't matter. Its the interior design that affects projection and sound but more importantly 3 months is far too soon to be messing with changing mouthpieces. Learn how to play, then you will have the experience and knowledge to determine what YOU need to meet YOUR goals.
 

Forum Contributor 2007 Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
816 Posts
I didn't look at you signature. You really have a fine set up as is. No reason to change it unless there is something you don't like about it. The ottolink 7 should be right in the zone for playing jazz.
 

Registered
Joined
121 Posts
i have been playing for three months and i noticed all of my favorite players use metal mouthpieces
should i be using them?
Do you know what metal mouthpiece Dave Koz and David Sanborn plays? I'm more interested in playing smooth jazz. I currently play a Selmer Ref.54 alto sax, with a Meyer 5 HR. I also use that with my Yamaha 23 and it sure makes the Yamaha sound more professional.
 

Registered
Joined
155 Posts
Do you know what metal mouthpiece Dave Koz and David Sanborn plays? I'm more interested in playing smooth jazz. I currently play a Selmer Ref.54 alto sax, with a Meyer 5 HR. I also use that with my Yamaha 23 and it sure makes the Yamaha sound more professional.
Im pretty sure Sanborn is using a Hard Rubber now. Metal mouthpieces are very very rare on alto players as they tend to brighten up an allready very bright sound. Try out a HR Beechler or one of the new SR Techs that are out before venturing into the metal realm.
 

Distinguished SOTW Member/Forum Contributor 2010
Joined
3,385 Posts
Do you know what metal mouthpiece Dave Koz and David Sanborn plays? I'm more interested in playing smooth jazz. I currently play a Selmer Ref.54 alto sax, with a Meyer 5 HR. I also use that with my Yamaha 23 and it sure makes the Yamaha sound more professional.
Koz plays a Beechler Bellite. I Dont know the tip opening, but I imagine its easily googled.

Sandborn played a modified Dukoff of some sort

You have to be a bit warey and understand that the sound you hear on a CD has been through the mixer and is at the mercy of the microphone and electronics etc.

Its not the material, its the design. My alto is naturally a little dark, but a bellite is my prefered piece to brighten it up. On the other hand a link stm (also metal) makes it darker still. Material on its own is not the most dominant factor regarding the sound.
 

Seeker Of A Clever Title.
Joined
3,795 Posts
Definitely design. If you are into that kind of sound, first try a Vandoren Jumbo Java (a45 or a55)before you venture into metal. It is hard rubber, but very similar in design to Koz's and Sanborn's mouthpieces. Spend some time with the mouthpiece because it will take time trying to get used to and control something like this and get the sound you want.
 

Registered
Joined
41 Posts
Dave Koz plays a Beechler Bellite (Custom) 7. Not sure what modifications they make to the piece to make it differ from the standard Bellite 7. I love the sound he makes, so much so i bought meself a Bellite 7 also. Honestly, they do sound amazing on Alto Sax...not so good on Tenor sax however.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top