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I was hoping to try my hand at creating bite plates for metal mouthpieces. Does anyone have any tips or recommend materials to use? Seems like Epoxy is the way to go from what I can tell. What else would I need?
 

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I used Marine-Tex 'white' epoxy for this bite plate... I cast in place wrapping a section of teflon sheet from MusicMedic around the mpc. This particular epoxy is used for gel coat repair and can be re-applied in tiny batches for flaws. Sands out well to 600,800 or as fine a grit Wet-or-dry paper as you care to go for.
 

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Ditto to others... The sanding/shaping is tedious & as well the process of using epoxy is 'not' intuituive! I have worked as a boatbuilder and pattern builder for many years, & this repair took over 4 hours of labor/setup/sanding etc. with many (8?) shop chemicals & many grits of sandpaper & cauls & coffee... Not quick and easy for a pro, & not forgiving for a lone neophyte!
 

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I'd tried all sorts to repair my mouthpiece. Some of the stuff some use you don't really want to be putting in your mouth. I'd tried Milliput & Apoxie sculpt but after 10mins or so of playing the surface softens and starts to wear. I have very sharp teeth and have always had a problem with wearing the rubber mouth pieces away, I don't even bite hard just the movement of my teeth cut the material like a knife. So for six months I've tried all sorts and today my latest stuff arrived, I wasn't holding out much hope but I'll give anything ago.

Well first thing - 10 minutes and it's gone off and ready to sand down. Well I say sand, it's so hard it doesn't really sand. Diamond files or diamond coated abrasive should be used to finish it. I roughed it out on my wet grinding wheel I sharpen my chisels on.

This stuff is rock hard and my teeth make no impression after 3 hours continuous play and I can wear metal mouth pieces away!

At last a fix.. I'm going to re do it so it looks like a proper bite plate rather than just a hole filled in.
 

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Carbon: What was the material you used? And how is it working after 6 weeks?

View attachment 41066

Well first thing - 10 minutes and it's gone off and ready to sand down. Well I say sand, it's so hard it doesn't really sand. Diamond files or diamond coated abrasive should be used to finish it. I roughed it out on my wet grinding wheel I sharpen my chisels on.

This stuff is rock hard and my teeth make no impression after 3 hours continuous play and I can wear metal mouth pieces away!

At last a fix.. I'm going to re do it so it looks like a proper bite plate rather than just a hole filled in.
 

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It the bite material is harder than your teeth, guess what wears?
This brings up a point I've wondered about for some time. One or the other material is going to yield, i.e. either your tooth (enamel) or the mouthpiece material. For players with uneven teeth, there can be an increased abrasion on the mouthpiece (which is my problem). No I do not want the dentist to grind my tooth even with the other teeth. So my concern is, are these materials the teeth are eating away safe for ingestion? Over time, the player is essentially eating their own mouthpiece. If I wear down my 3M Scotch Weld (DP810), guess where it's going. Dental acrylic, Scotch Weld, what have you. MoJo, McMaster Carr does sell Spring Steel Shim stock (pretty hard stuff), would it be impossible to cut to fit, glue on, shape and minimize wear? Or I might be visiting the dentist quicker than normal??? I get the impression most of us probably consider the trace amounts of the material may be less dangerous to our body than then anything else we expose ourselves to these days?
 

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View attachment 41066

I'd tried all sorts to repair my mouthpiece. Some of the stuff some use you don't really want to be putting in your mouth. I'd tried Milliput & Apoxie sculpt but after 10mins or so of playing the surface softens and starts to wear. I have very sharp teeth and have always had a problem with wearing the rubber mouth pieces away
If Milliput softens then you are not mixing it right or not waiting long enough for it to fully cure. That's what I use and mine hardens like stone. I have sharpish teeth too and I'd break one before biting through the bite plates I've made with it. I use patches on all my mp's so that protects my teeth.
 

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Use a mouthpiece patch.

This brings up a point I've wondered about for some time. One or the other material is going to yield, i.e. either your tooth (enamel) or the mouthpiece material. For players with uneven teeth, there can be an increased abrasion on the mouthpiece (which is my problem). No I do not want the dentist to grind my tooth even with the other teeth. So my concern is, are these materials the teeth are eating away safe for ingestion? Over time, the player is essentially eating their own mouthpiece. If I wear down my 3M Scotch Weld (DP810), guess where it's going. Dental acrylic, Scotch Weld, what have you. MoJo, McMaster Carr does sell Spring Steel Shim stock (pretty hard stuff), would it be impossible to cut to fit, glue on, shape and minimize wear? Or I might be visiting the dentist quicker than normal??? I get the impression most of us probably consider the trace amounts of the material may be less dangerous to our body than then anything else we expose ourselves to these days?
 

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Ditto on the mouthpiece patch. I've repaired my pieces with black Fix-It epoxy and then cover with one of Theo's hard mouthpiece patches or a Runyon mouthpiece patch. Works great and you never have the issue again - although the patch needs replacing from time to time.
 

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Yes, it's an understatement to use mouthpiece patches, however while I get the impression traditional mouthpiece patches work well for many players, my point above was they do not last long for non perfect teeth... I cut through my patches after about 3 hrs of playing (say two sessions) sometimes faster.

So I was interested about anyone's experiences with harder patches, (harder than comes on traditional patches) and recommended sources. Almost putting a metal patch on a rubber mouthpiece.

I was curious with other's experiences/experiments after looking at some of Mojo's repairs on line of mouthpiece tooth grooved mthpc repairs including a metal Otto Link.(using Scotch Weld/melted metals). Mojo has worked on refacing my mthpcs and done an excellent job on them.
 

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I have some .006" thick stainless steel shim stock if you want to try a piece. I purchased some a while back to make my own Spoilers before I found out the metal part did not do anything.

For bite repairs I'm now using black acrylic powder and monomer sold to make fake fingernails. It sets a little harder than the 3M DP-310 acrylic.

I would still recommend having the sharp edges of your teeth sanded some.
 

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Mojo, I'll take you up on the steel experiment (I'll pm you). Regarding the suggestion to abrade my crooked tooth (as others have suggested) you should see the horror on my dentist's face when I mentioned that just a few months ago. His suggestion was braces (maybe even the non wired versions they're doing now). Time...money...
 

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I'll second the acrylic method. I've used the 3M stuff. It's good but only on larger biteplate repair areas. Honestly, a lot of times I've used that stuff in the past and sent it to customers, it winds up falling out. The cure time is also very long (12 hours before you can work on it or something like that?) and a lot of times I don't have time to wait that long for it to set up. So then I switched over to fingernail-type 2-part acrylic mixtures which you can get from places like Sally Beauty Supply. This consists of a powder (you can get any color, although black is probably most commonly used), and a (very stinky) liquid which cures the powder. The cure time is very fast, within a few minutes it'll be too hard to shape anymore, and in like 20-30 minutes you can file/sand it. Only problem is you've gotta put a lot of pressure on it with your thumb while it cures, otherwise there's lots of air bubbles when you're filing away to smooth it out. For that reason, I grew tired of working with it... Now I'm using Apoxie 2-part black colored modeling "clay" because it is non-toxic and cures harder/more evenly.

Here's a picture of an old Brilhart biteplae I fixed with 2-part acrylic.
 

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I used some of that to fill in chipped ivory on piano keys. I used tape underneath to support the acrylic. For me the difficulty was matching color.
I'll second the acrylic method. I've used the 3M stuff. It's good but only on larger biteplate repair areas. Honestly, a lot of times I've used that stuff in the past and sent it to customers, it winds up falling out. The cure time is also very long (12 hours before you can work on it or something like that?) and a lot of times I don't have time to wait that long for it to set up. So then I switched over to fingernail-type 2-part acrylic mixtures which you can get from places like Sally Beauty Supply. This consists of a powder (you can get any color, although black is probably most commonly used), and a (very stinky) liquid which cures the powder. The cure time is very fast, within a few minutes it'll be too hard to shape anymore, and in like 20-30 minutes you can file/sand it. Only problem is you've gotta put a lot of pressure on it with your thumb while it cures, otherwise there's lots of air bubbles when you're filing away to smooth it out. For that reason, I grew tired of working with it... Now I'm using Apoxie 2-part black colored modeling "clay" because it is non-toxic and cures harder/more evenly.

Here's a picture of an old Brilhart biteplae I fixed with 2-part acrylic.
 
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