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Discussion Starter #1
This is one I've been thinking about for quite some time...As a full time military musician I find myself playing in Concert Band, Big Band, combos, parade bands, sax quartets…

Along with the playing aspect of the job, our band of thirty five also has to administer itself; finance dept., stores dept., operations, etc. Basically all the nuts and bolts of running a band plus the added excitement of a government organization:).

My question is whether or not an hour of time rehearsing a concert band should be assessed the same value as an hours’ worth of administrative duties. How much more mental energy is required for intense rehearsal vs administrative office work? How much cognitive ability is left after a couple hours of rehearsing? Personally, after two good hour of rehearsal my brain is pretty toasted…

Anyone aware of any studies that have been published that may relate to my questions?

Thanks and Happy Saxophoning!
 

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I did pretty much the same exact thing when I was in the USAF Band in the mid 80's. The band I was in was also 35 piece and I was in "ops", meaning I booked the tours, coordinated everything with recruiters, submitted bids for lodging/hotels, arranged for all of the transportation needs, etc. No offense, but it's part of the job. Just like everything else in life, you learn to manage and go through the many bumps in the road during the process. In hindsight, I think it was easier than post military life in some ways. At least I knew my salary was consistent and gigs were plentiful. Yeah, it was mentally stimulating to the point of sometimes being a tad overwhelming, but I was also 35 or so yrs. younger and more worried about finding time to hang out with friends and chasing tail.
I'm sure you're not the only one in the band who has those lovely extra-curricular duties. Ask some of the others how they manage things and it'll work out. Consider yourself fortunate to have the gig and "soldier on". ;-)
 

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I agree with jgreiner and caution anyone about getting fixated the pros and cons of the administrative end of music. I think the most successful musicians nowadays do the administrative stuff extremely well.....

Just sitting in the band and playing extremely well will help more people say “That Band is Amazing.” Getting on committees and communicating with the world (logistics, coordination, contracting gigs) is what is going to make people say “Saxman 11, he is an amazing musician and great to work with. I’d like to hire him one day”. Doesn’t seem fair, but life is not about musicians, or businessmen or engineers or any other profession. It is about people. The better we interact with ‘outsiders’ the more successful we will be in any field.

.....maybe I am jumping to conclusions on the intent of the OP, but I see the opportunity to do administrative work as an opportunity to be better recognized in one’s field.
 

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I too was Director of Ops in the AF Band, first a 60 piece then a 48 piece. I found that, at the time, rehearsal and gigs were a pleasure that didn't deplete me mentally that much, maybe physically a bit; the Ops gig was much more mentally taxing for me. As an information security guy for the past umpteen years, neither hold a candle to the mental effort required of me post-AF Band. Being in the AF Band was the easiest gig I ever had, except for maybe cruise ships.
 

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Anything that you do that requires energy but gives you joy and satisfaction, will be less taxing than what you're doing just because it's a requirement.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the insights...some interesting point.
 
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