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Tenor: Eastman 52nd St, Alto: P. Mauriat 67RDK, Soprano: Eastern Music Curvy
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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
Finally returned home from vacation - going to meet up this Sunday! It will just be me the guitarist and a drummer. Should be a fun time. Gotta get some practice in today though!
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Delayed sadly - hoping to a for next weekend!
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
Well, sad to report that nothing came to fruition from the previous group. But I"m now actually lined up for an audition for a big band! Seems they want me to sit in on a rehearsal this Tuesday for a Tenor seat!
 

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That's sounds even better Jared. :)

Good luck with the rehearsal and see our private conversation for some attention points when playing in a Big Band.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
That's sounds even better Jared. :)

Good luck with the rehearsal and see our private conversation for some attention points when playing in a Big Band.
Definitely feels like a better match. Thanks again for the advice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Audition went well, very fun group and I think I'll be back next week! Sadly, got a flat on the way home, so not the best ending to my night!
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
Sounds good Jared (except for the flat [tire I guess!]).
Thanks Peter! My sight reading was definitely not the best. Must have missed 90% of the key changes (which were very frequent). Awaiting copies of the sheets and make sure I'm better prepared next time and can knock it out!
 

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My sight reading was definitely not the best. Must have missed 90% of the key changes (which were very frequent).
Probably not the biggest deal if you're gonna be a regular in a big band... in my experience, the only sight reading I did with big bands was on last-minute sub calls. I hope you get a call back!
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Probably not the biggest deal if you're gonna be a regular in a big band... in my experience, the only sight reading I did with big bands was on last-minute sub calls. I hope you get a call back!
Yeah, the lead Alto even said he didn't expect that of me, and most of the tunes took a while for the band to get all those changes fown too. Very hopeful for a call back and sheet music, the band members made it sound like they were excited to have me in.
 

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Thanks Peter! My sight reading was definitely not the best. Must have missed 90% of the key changes (which were very frequent). Awaiting copies of the sheets and make sure I'm better prepared next time and can knock it out!
Part of sightreading is developing a habit of looking over a tune for its "road map" before playing - look for tempo indications, key changes, repeats, D.S., dynamics, and potential tough spots. Don't forget to listen to your section leader for articulation and dynamic cues. It is useful to determine what parts in the brass section are doubling your part on various tunes - you'll need to learn who to listen to for best blend and intonation.

Which tenor book are you reading? In my experience, the second tenor book, aka 4th sax, is the most technically challenging of the lot. I often thought that parts for all the other four saxes were written first, then the second tenor part was written to fill in the holes in the harmony.

Enjoy the ride!
 
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Part of sightreading is developing a habit of looking over a tune for its "road map" before playing - look for tempo indications, key changes, repeats, D.S., dynamics, and potential tough spots.

Enjoy the ride!
Those are indeed the important things to check out.

Normally the first tenor should point out those things to you if you are new to the party (I did the same last Tuesday rehearsal to a guest player on second tenor).
 

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Discussion Starter · #55 ·
Part of sightreading is developing a habit of looking over a tune for its "road map" before playing - look for tempo indications, key changes, repeats, D.S., dynamics, and potential tough spots. Don't forget to listen to your section leader for articulation and dynamic cues. It is useful to determine what parts in the brass section are doubling your part on various tunes - you'll need to learn who to listen to for best blend and intonation.

Which tenor book are you reading? In my experience, the second tenor book, aka 4th sax, is the most technically challenging of the lot. I often thought that parts for all the other four saxes were written first, then the second tenor part was written to fill in the holes in the harmony.

Enjoy the ride!
Good point! I normally will pre-read music to check signatures, changes, and eyes on the difficult bits. However, the group was trying to get through a lot of their setlist, so the practice was pretty hurried. I often would just finish getting a tune up as it was getting counted off to begin playing, but I understood - they wanted to get through them quick for a gig they have very soon.

It is indeed the 2nd tenor line, which I was surprised could be quite difficult! Some of t

Those jumps were quite the change for me! But thanks for the advice and hoping to keep it rolling in the band
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
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I hope you get to keep your seat Jared! This is the best experience you can get, I fondly remember the first "working" big band I was in (we played every Monday night). I started second alto and moved up to lead after a year or so. Lotta gigs came from my being in that band, and a lotta fond memories . Oh yeah, my wife too :) - though that's a very long story....
 

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Discussion Starter · #58 ·
Well tire is fixed! Now just awaiting the sheet music and word on next week's rehearsal. Fingers crossed.


I hope you get to keep your seat Jared! This is the best experience you can get, I fondly remember the first "working" big band I was in (we played every Monday night). I started second alto and moved up to lead after a year or so. Lotta gigs came from my being in that band, and a lotta fond memories . Oh yeah, my wife too :) - though that's a very long story....
I'm hoping this will provide more opportunities as well. They seem to be a pretty active group with lots of gigs too.
 

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Probably not the biggest deal if you're gonna be a regular in a big band... in my experience, the only sight reading I did with big bands was on last-minute sub calls. I hope you get a call back!
Depends on how big the book is. In the commercial bands I've worked with, there are charts that everyone's played so often we all have them memorized (the Miller charts, for example), charts that the particular band plays all the time and everyone in the band's familiar with, and charts the band leader calls every so often and everyone's scuffling. And then there's the chart the bandleader passes out just before downbeat. So you can't let your sightreading drop too far.
 

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Depends on how big the book is. In the commercial bands I've worked with, there are charts that everyone's played so often we all have them memorized (the Miller charts, for example), charts that the particular band plays all the time and everyone in the band's familiar with, and charts the band leader calls every so often and everyone's scuffling. And then there's the chart the bandleader passes out just before downbeat. So you can't let your sightreading drop too far.
Certainly, I'm all for maintaining sight reading chops. I just meant it's probably not top priority in auditions for a new big band regular.
 
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