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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
A saying I have come to learn and respect is one does not know what one does not know.

In discussions with some people on some stuff I have seen, it was suggested I do a walk along on a sax being mechanically repaired in my shop. I have over 200 guitar repair follow alongs (in my signature line "How to Series"), this is my one and only sax one, so it will be fairly long and picture intensive

This sax is not finished yet, I started it in october last year, school christmas repairs sidelined this restoration for a couple of months. My day to day repair schedule and repad schedule keeps me fairly busy, so mechanical restorations like these I pre warn customers may take a few months if not longer solely due to my workload

Hope it is of interest to some people, it is not the definitive correct way of doing repairs, it is simply my way.

 

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Nice work so far! I'm interested in that drill jig that you used for posts. Do you know where Matt bought it?
Is this a fully paid repair or do you do some of this for free? I'm having a hard time understanding why anyone would pay for a complete mechanical overhaul on a Besson of all instruments in the world ;) Some people won't even pay for mechanical overhauls on a Selmer.
 

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I'm having a hard time understanding why anyone would pay for a complete mechanical overhaul on a Besson of all instruments in the world
Well the Besson's were (usually) Cousenon's and these are far more than fine instruments. I love Cousenon saxes!

Hey Sismo - impressive photography / techniques.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nice work so far! I'm interested in that drill jig that you used for posts. Do you know where Matt bought it?
Matt actually made these, Ferees tools sell an equivelant
Is this a fully paid repair or do you do some of this for free? I'm having a hard time understanding why anyone would pay for a complete mechanical overhaul on a Besson of all instruments in the world
Yes fully paid, it came to me vee a music store contract, I always quote repad or repad with mechanicals, the store authorised repad with mechanicals as it has sentimental value to the owner.
 

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A saying I have come to learn and respect is one does not know what one does not know.

In discussions with some people on some stuff I have seen, it was suggested I do a walk along on a sax being mechanically repaired in my shop. I have over 200 guitar repair follow alongs (in my signature line "How to Series"), this is my one and only sax one, so it will be fairly long and picture intensive

This sax is not finished yet and I will update as I do it, my day to day repair schedule and repad schedule keeps me fairly busy, so mechanical restorations like these I pre warn customers may take a few months if not longer solely due to my workload

Hope it is of interest to some people, it is not the definitive correct way of doing repairs, it is simply my way.

Truly impressive and excellent!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Only suggestion is the grey background is a bit dark and makes it a little harder to read the text than it could be
Thankyou, modified now to a lighter grey, you may need to hit refresh on each page for it to take effect
Simso, where did you source the spot facing tools from?
I recommend Brian Russells cutters available through J L Smith or direct to him if you want a custom one, I actually make my own but have used Brians cutters - they are quality
 

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Matt actually made these, Ferees tools sell an equivelant
That's cool :)
Thanks I found it! H20 Post Drilling Jig

Yes fully paid, it came to me vee a music store contract, I always quote repad or repad with mechanicals, the store authorised repad with mechanicals as it has sentimental value to the owner.
Great to see that some people doesn't just care about the resale value (even though I fully understand and respect why resale value is important). You are saving a piece of saxophone history and a great playing horn probably.
 

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Kudos Simso for this excellent information and professional presentation. Thank you so much for going to the time and effort to put this together and sharing it with the rest of us. For those of use who got into saxophone repair without a "machinist/mechanical" background, this presentation provides an interesting insight into the approach and thought process of someone with your professional background in mechanics. I am looking forward to the next installment and trying out some of the new things I learned.
 

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Excellent writeup and super cool to see information like this publicly available. Gave me a lot to think about with my own methods! Thank you and well done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Thanks. Your rod slotting jig looks like a big time saver from doing it by hand.
This is another tool that can be purchased through Ferees, for smaller flute / clarinet / oboe rods the screw slot is a little too wide
 

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Thanks simso, this is great info! Really appreciate it! Do you find the MM Knipex swedging pliers are the best for the job? Trying to decide if I should just bite the bullet and get them. Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Do you find the MM Knipex swedging pliers are the best for the job?
I actually find the knipex ones to be pretty savage (which can be good), they create a lot of force, i have around 10 different sweding pliers, each one really serves a specific situation, they were the ones i used that time due to hinge tube thickness.

Your way is a good way!
Very nicely done!
Thankyou,
Pretty sure most repairers do it the same way, it is the documenting each step that has become a massive undertaking :)
 

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it is the documenting each step that has become a massive undertaking :)
It’s crazy how much time it takes to stage a picture. Review, retake until usable shot is captured. It’s as much of a art as the repair itself. Often taking more time than the repair.
Thank you for your generous time putting this all together.
 
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