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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It looks like I'll be a lot more active on Tenor in the next year so I upgraded to one that is more reliable. It is used however and the pads are nearing the end of their life so I plan on re-padding it. I need as little downtime as possible so I'd like to gather all the materials I'll need before I strip the horn. I was told that I could measure the pad cups without removing the pads by measuring the outside diameter of the pad cup and subtracting 2mm for the rim of the key cup. Is this entirely accurate in measuring the pad cups? If not, what is a better way?

Thanks!
-Scott
 

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Scott,

A quality pair of digital or analog vernier calipers would be best to measure the inside diameter of the key cup, which is the size of the outer diameter of the pad. I would take 3 or 4 different measurements to get an average size. If a key cup has been distorted (oval/egg-shaped), you will get an inaccurate pad size reading. While you didn't state the make/model of tenor sax, for many common instruments, pad sets are available from many sources. If you order individual pads for it, I suggest youi order them in millimeters, not 32nds of an inch.
 

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Scott

I thought you said in an earlier post that you were apprenticing in a shop? If so that leads me to wonder two questions:

1. You would already know that the 2mm less than the outside diameter isn't the most accurate measure, no?

2. Why on earth would an apprentice need to order pads when the shop they work in is most likely fully stocked?
 

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Hmm. Interesting questions.

"I was told that I could measure the pad cups without removing the pads by measuring the outside diameter of the pad cup and subtracting 2mm for the rim of the key cup. Is this entirely accurate in measuring the pad cups? "

Of course you can ascertain yourself just how much accuracy is lost from doing this, by measuring the thickness of the metal of the walls of the key cups, which varies from sax to sax.

After removing the pad I measure the inside of the cup with a vernier, then first reach for that size pad in my stocks. But as often as not, I find that the next 0.5 mm size up is a better fit. A snug fit is far preferable because then you are less likely to get glue ooze around the pad.

IMO to measure and then order, is a much rougher approach, than getting a true match by trial.
 

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A. Measure with calipers only - not with a ruler. And use proper technique
B. Measure each cup in at least two axes.
C. The most superb fit will be achieved with trial and error but barring that its best to measure the inside diameter.
D. To decrease downtime its reasonable to estimate 2mm less than the outside diameter but it may be wise to order extra pads on either side of the measurements in order to "bracket" the correct one.
E. If time and money are issues just assuem 2mm less than the outside diameter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
tbone said:
Scott

I thought you said in an earlier post that you were apprenticing in a shop? If so that leads me to wonder two questions:

1. You would already know that the 2mm less than the outside diameter isn't the most accurate measure, no?

2. Why on earth would an apprentice need to order pads when the shop they work in is most likely fully stocked?
1. - Yes, thats why I asked.

2. - I'll be using Roo pads and the store doesnt stock them.

Its a Yami 62 tenor in fairly new condition, and I could probably use one of the store rentals while the horn is out of commission. Just thought I'd ask...
 

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BB,
A Yamaha YTS-62 requires 2-9mm, 5-18.3mm, 1-20.2mm, 3-27.9mm, 1-30.6mm, 1-33.8mm, 1-34.4mm, 3-38.6mm, 3-40.6mm, 2-44.5mm, 1-48.4mm, and 2-52.1mm pads, per Yamaha.

This info is contained in the Yamaha "Specs for Techs" publication. Hope this helps.
 

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But what a huge downside.... All those seldom-used sizes (and bassoon pads!) sitting there tying up capital without making any profit.

It would seem that the REAL cost of having the right size on hand should be reflected in much higher pad charges. That would blow the customer over, so I build it into the time charge. I suppose other technicians do the same.

This is a far bigger issue for technicians in the nether regions of the globe.

I commend Musicmedic for selling in small quantities, for reasonable prices, offering plenty help, and remaining in business. That is some achievement.
 

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Gordon (NZ) said:
But what a huge downside.... All those seldom-used sizes (and bassoon pads!) sitting there tying up capital without making any profit.

It would seem that the REAL cost of having the right size on hand should be reflected in much higher pad charges. That would blow the customer over, so I build it into the time charge. I suppose other technicians do the same.

This is a far bigger issue for technicians in the nether regions of the globe.

I commend Musicmedic for selling in small quantities, for reasonable prices, offering plenty help, and remaining in business. That is some achievement.
Yeah Gordo! It sure is great having Curt only a day away by mail. I've got Curt's fine company to the east and Jeff Smith's fine company to the west. Both give me a real short turn around time. Life is good! :D
 
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