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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi!

If anyone has the album and could take a listen, I'd love to get some help on figuring out what chords McCoy outlines, especially on the A section. He spices up the basic changes in a number of different ways, but there's a recurring progression on the A section. My piano got badly out of tune so it makes it hard to transcribe those chords.

Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
How about this?

Concert:

| Dm | G7 | Gm | A7 |
| G#7 | G7 |C7\B7|Bb7\A7|

Bb:

| Em | A7 | Am | B7 |
| A#7 | A7 |D7\Db7|C7\B7|
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I suppose that Gm chord in bar 3 could be justified as the I drivative of an E locrian #2? Right? :doubt:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
AFAIK, there are two studio versions of Satin Doll McCoy recorded. One on "Nights Of Ballads And Blues" and on "Double Trios". I'm talking about the latter.
 

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I suppose that Gm chord in bar 3 could be justified as the I drivative of an E locrian #2? Right? :doubt:
Em7b5/G

Yes, certainly possible.
 

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Magical Pig...If McCoy's chords area tad' hard to absorb/ hear it's because he uses Quartal harmony on the chords.Then it's often a matter of style, more often than a matter of explicit notation. What's happening within the voicing.

OK- To touch on it briefly. There are certain signature chords that I consider to be indicators that quartal harmony is in play. sus9, sus13, Maj13, 6/9, PLUS- beyond the 60s you get, the more you tend to find it. McCoy Tyner is one of the foremost early proponents of quartal harmony!

More generally, it's entirely possible to substitute quartal harmony over any non-dominant chord in a tune.
There are two easy generative approaches to coming to terms with this. Both of the approaches are easy to describe, both arrive at pretty much the same place, this is a bit of work. For a saxophonist, here's _WHY_It's so important to know all your major/Minor/Aug/Dim chords as I state in my " Developing A Jazz Vocab" on SOTW. :)Check it- it's prety self-explanitory.

STEP #1: diatonically planed quartals. On a sheet of manuscript paper, write out the following chord (key of C Major): A D G C. Underneath this, write a C root. The chord: C 6/9 no 3. Next, the entire chord up one diatonic note to obtain B E A D. Leave the C root intact. The chord: CMaj13.
Go up one note to obtain: C F B E. The fourth, F, in the chord is "avoid-ish", when playing over I chords. Continue the process to obtain all 7 diatonic quartals in the key of C Major. Now rewrite the entire set with a D root, instaead of a C root, and consider this set as a set of useful quartal voicings/subs for a Dm (ii of C major). Repeat the procedure for each possible root in the key of C Major. The general idea: all quartal stacks over an appropriate root are good substitutions, with the exception of subs for Imaj7, that contain the fourth degree of the scale (F, in the C major example). Many of these chords are a bit stark by themselves. Many of them don't have 3rds. That is what I'm talking about! But they tend to consistently work well as alternating pairs of voicings in the same bar, or as ascending or descending planed stacks. One quartal voice deosn't necessarily contain a 3rd or a 7th; but a pair (or an ascending or descending group) always includes both in one or the other of the pair.

STEP # 2: Pentatonics with displaced roots. Consider all voicings of all chords constructed from a pentatonic scale. These are functionally equavialent to quartals, becausing collapsing the notes of a quartal stack of five notes into a single octave produces a pentatonic scale. Any pentatonic chord is also a voicing of a quartal stack. In the key of C major, there are three possible pentatonic scales: C D E G A; C D F G A; D E G A B. For each, construct ascending stacked voices within the scale.

The primary difference is that the pentatonic voicings have a more distincly open sound to them than the corresponding quartal stack. A very distinctive sound. That_distinctive sound_is what McCoy does to the basic chords on" Satin Doll".

NOTE- This is basics. Nothing frothy or over the edge. The pentatonic thing I've mentioned is pretty useful in any genre of music.

HTH.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Wow, thanks Tim this is great!! I'll shed those sounds. I've always wanted to hear McCoy chords better!
 

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I think Mark Levine talked about this reharmonization in his book, and plays it here on the link in the last A section:


D-7 G7 | Eb-7 Ab7 | E-7 A7 | F-7 Bb7 |
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'll have to listen to the entire track again but I think he does that just on the melody.
 
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