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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In late December early January I purchased a 1920 era Conn Stencil Soprano from Kritavi. I got a few pictures from Kritavi before I purchased the horn. But I knew that it required a full overhaul. So I talked to Matt, and had the horn sent to him. It was my first time getting a full overhaul on a horn. I have nothing but positive things to say about the whole situation. Their were many instances in this deal, because of different complications that came up for the deal to fall apart. But everything went smoothly from purchase to getting the horn in my hands.

A Full overhaul was done on the horn. I will post some before and after pics when I get the chance. When I first saw the horn from pictures, all I saw was potential. It was covered in Tarnish, so I was unsure of the amount of plating that the horn had. I was also unsure of the mechanical condition of the horn, or how much work would be required to get it playing again. This hands down is probably one of the finest looking horns I have had the opportunity to play. And that is thanks to Matt's restoration work on it.

When it Got here, the horn was extremely well packed. Corks were placed so that the keys wouldn't move. Honestly this was the best packing job I had ever seen on an instrument. Something I was not expecting which I should of was the amount of air it takes to play the horn. I have owned a modern soprano and I could half *ss the air going into the horn on my previous soprano. On this horn you can't do it. Which is nice, and the keys. I feel the layout on a vintage alto/tenor is just different then that of the soprano. More clarinet like with the key height set up. Again not bad but something that takes some getting used to.

When it was time for me to pay for the work, I didn't have a way to complete the paperwork that Sam Ash requires. I ended up pay-paling the money to him, for all the work + taxes+ a new case and shipping. So he had the horn and the money. This is not something I would usually doing. But I decided to go ahead with it because of his reputation on the forum. And he ended up refunding about $20 because of overestimation of shipping cost. To me this speaks volumes about his Morales and ethics. Because he could of very easily pocketed the $20 and I would of never known.

This by far is the finest soprano I have ever had the opportunity to play, and I am very happy with this purchase. I currently have a Martin Committee that when its time for it to be overhauled I'll be sending to Matt, regardless of where I am in the world. Because of how this deal went down. My only regret is not sending other horns to him sooner to get work done.

Thanks for a great horn, and I will defiantly be doing business with you again.
 

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vintage sops can be great fun.
The 4M I have is a real screamer

Selling my 4m as I don't use it enough( usually use one of my yani sops)
(buyer already lined up so no pm's please)

sops take a lot more pressure than other saxes, much more like a clarinet.

On my 4M I needed some padding on the hook to hold it more than a few minutes comfortably.
Use a ridenour thumb saddle, about $12 from weiner music or others.


So going to post any sound samples of your new vintage sop ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
vintage sops can be great fun.
The 4M I have is a real screamer

Selling my 4m as I don't use it enough( usually use one of my yani sops)
(buyer already lined up so no pm's please)

sops take a lot more pressure than other saxes, much more like a clarinet.

On my 4M I needed some padding on the hook to hold it more than a few minutes comfortably.
Use a ridenour thumb saddle, about $12 from weiner music or others.

So going to post any sound samples of your new vintage sop ?
The tone on this soprano is simply amazing. But I want some time to develop my tone on it before posting any recordings
 

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One more vote of confidence for Matt. He restored 2 horns for me in '06 that are now top-class players.
Each required some extensive neck work, which turned out perfect, sonically and visually.
If your lacquer is lousy, consider the no-buff bare brass option, as I did. They look as good as they sound.

1930 Martin Master "typewriter" soprano
1932 Buescher New Aristocrat tenor
 

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Very nice soprano Paul. I would assume they're relatively rare? And it's always welcome to hear first hand accounts for great service from our techs here.
 

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Very nice soprano Paul. I would assume they're relatively rare?
That they are. Yet they're not hot collectibles. No typweriters are, because folks think they're unplayable.

I wonder how he's fairing, down there in NC??? We miss him in brooklyn.
I would imagine he's happy not to pe part of the massive oversupply of good sax techs in the NYC area...
 

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Matt's a great guy...I'm not sure, however, if his new show--Pimp your sax and your truck--is going to make it.
 

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I wonder how he's fairing, down there in NC??? We miss him in brooklyn.
We do, but that hasn't stopped me from mailing my major projects down there. Even a New Yorker knows where NC is -- most of the license plates around the city are from there.
 

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I had a very similar pan am horn for a year or two --- GREAT players. very unique sopranos, very cool. Enjoy her!
 

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Even a New Yorker knows where NC is -- most of the license plates around the city are from there.
I thought folks got it mixed up with North Dakota. But they may have been faking it to sound cool.
 

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North Dakota. Hmmm... Never heard of it.

Is that one of those small enclaves in the unexplored part of the US I fly over on my way to LA?
 

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Shipping a horn somewhere to get repaired is ridiculous to me. sorry.
I need to have a repair guy I can sit with while he makes adjustments.
Thats also why I stay away from 48th St.
 

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I understand and agree, oddly enough. I've sent Matt my major projects (he's doing a full restoration on a bari now), but in each case I have someone local, Shelly Tanabe (in Queens), do the adjustments needed to personalize the horn. I can live without one of my horns for an extended period of time, as I'm not using them for a living. As both Matt and Shelly will tell you, I'm also quite anal about playing condition, so this arrangement has worked well for me as they work well together.

That said, it's a pretty special set of circumstances, may not work for everyone, and a fair comment.

BTW, if you're trying to stay away from downtown and don't feel like dealing with UPS, Shelly's an awesome tech and probably just as anal retentive as Matt. She just doesn't like doing major dent work on baris. :) Small horns, no problem. She also does really awesome things with resin on key extensions.

http://www.windplayerservices.com/

Tell her I sent you.
 

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I wonder how he's fairing, down there in NC??? We miss him in brooklyn.
He'd have to tell you how he likes it here in North Cackalaky himself. But I'm sure glad he's here. He did my current alto and I couldn't be happier. It's nice to be able to stop by the store where his shop is and just chat. He's very knowledgeable and just an all around good guy. It's also nice to see he's busy...so please help keep it that way so he'll stay right here in Raleigh!
 
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