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I notice in the signatures of some people around here, that multiple horns they own "match" as in someone out here might have 3 SDA (S,A,T). Of course there are those who are in absolute love with their line of 2 or 3 Mark VI's. And others who have Alto/Tenor 82z's.

What would you say are benefits of staying with the same model sax between soprano, alto, tenor, bari? Are there any drawbacks?
 

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Personally, I was just so satisfied with my Z alto that I would accept no substitutes for my choice of tenor. I became so familiar with the acoustics, sound quality, lay of the keys, tuning tendencies, etc that I began to identify with Yamaha no matter what pitch of saxophone I was playing.

I think we just develop an affinity for a make and model once we find one that really suits us. Still, no two saxes are created equal, and sometimes we just get lucky playing a Selmer SIII alto and a Buescher tenor ca. 1920. However, there must be a reason you're playing two 61s!
 

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The only bennefit I can think of is that they match. And they might have a similar feel.
 

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Hey. I actually had that same question a few years back. Here's what I have come to think. It really doesn't matter if your horns match or not. I have stuck to all selmer horns because I'm comfortable with the key layout.

Anyhow, here are my horns:
Tenor: Mark VI (86XXX)
Alto: Reference 54
Sop: Series III (Matte finish)

As you can tell, my horns don't match at all. haha, one trashed lookin tenor (VERY sick though), a prefect condition alto, and a faked old look on soprano. I'd say if you like the horn thats fine. I mean really, there are differences you'll get used to just from playing alto and tenor, so having different horns doesn't really add that much trouble (at least in my experience).
If you have a fav. model for alto or tenor or whatever, certainly try the counterpart for other saxes, but don't limit yourself.
 

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I had a Dolnet Royal Jazz alto some years ago, which I really liked. However, it just played differently, especially going down an octave and also had extra keys. It was too far removed from my other saxes to keep.

I also have a Typewriter alto. In this instance, the fingering is a little different, as might be expected.

My vintage US saxes have a more traditional key lay-out, unlike the Selmers and all that copy them. I am much more comfortable with this.

So, to me, the answer is yes, there are very real reasons to play saxes with similar feel ... and possibly even of the same make.
 

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dburlone said:
What would you say are benefits of staying with the same model sax between soprano, alto, tenor, bari? Are there any drawbacks?
I guess the benefit would be a sense of familiarity, but I actually would prefer the variation. Not only because a company might make an outstanding tenor, but not such a hot alto (or visa versa), but I don't want to play an alto or tenor in the same manner; or bari and soprano as well. I want them to be different. To feel different. To play different.
 

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I have a full set of Yamaha 62 saxes SATB in the purple logo serial range (except the YBS is engraved logo) and 5 digit Selmer alto and tenor. Many of the combo gigs require switching horns, sometimes during the same tune. If so, I like to stay with either the Selmer sound or the Yamaha speed and ergos, depending on the gig. (I only bring one set, of course). I don't like to mix between the brands partly because intonation spectrum seems different for each brand.

--Sidepipes
 

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I'm with Grumps on this one - on every count.
 

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I am working on a matched set of late/transitional New Wonder II saxes, partly because they are all equally great and partly because it is the one sax thing I have never had.

So far, I've got soprano (straight), alto, C tenor and tenor. I'd love a curved soprano and a bari, and if I dare to dream, a sopranino, and a F mezzo. As far as I know there wasn't a late C soprano made.
 

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What are those?
 

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Now that's just cute. ;)
 

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Dr G said:
Now that's just cute. ;)
Cute? Heck, I call 'em Dead Man's Horns. Their original owner was a jazz player/composer in the DC area and used to play piano on the side for a modern dance class my mother used to run at a local college many, many years ago. Tragically, he died young from cancer. His family knew he held my mother in high regard and that she had a son that played, so they gave them to her to give to me. I know... lucky bastard.
 

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I won't comment on your origins but I concur that you are indeed fortunate. ;)

Cheers!
 

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Yeah, I used to think I was a horn magnet. Some of the horns I was given by friends of the family or business contacts include:

The VI soprano and sopranino
A New Wonder Bari
A curved TT soprano
A Martin Handcraft stencil tenor
An SBA alto

I once really pissed someone off when I declined to buy their VI tenor and jokingly said I'd just wait for one to arrive on the doorstep. I was just kidding though; or I must have been, as I'm still waiting for that one...
 
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