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Recently I acquired a Selmer Soloist D for tenor, and I am absolutely in love with it. It feels really comfortable for me in both jazz and symphonic settings, whereas I used to switch between a Link STM 7* and an s80 C*. I'm looking to make a similar move for a soloist alto mouthpiece, but I am hesitant on which opening to order. From articles like http://www.saxontheweb.net/Coats/mouthpiece.html#sizes, some of what I've heard Mojo say, and from just looking at tip opening charts, it would seem that a D would feel more open on alto (same as a link 6) than it does on tenor (same as a link 5). Obviously the best way to decide is by trying them, but I have to order them online as I've never seen music stores carry soloists. What would be the equivalent size to a tenor soloist D on alto? C*, C**, or D?

Thanks again!
 

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It's been my experience that Selmer tip openings tend to be about one size bigger on tenor. So an S80 D on tenor is the equivalent of a C* on alto.
 

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Selmer seems to have messed up with their legit tip openings for tenor; they are very closed, which is likely why you like the D and not the C*. Yes, the C* for alto would make sense for you.
 

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I use a D on alto and if I were to use a Selmer for tenor, it would be about an F....so I would put a C* alto to be similar to an E for tenor.
 

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People must be wanting to use their Xmas money, or extra holiday gig money on mouthpieces.
Ah... That makes as much sense as anything.

Ligatures are next!
 

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I'm seeing about a 0.020 difference between my tenor and alto setups. I think that's fairly common.

Alto:
Philtone Rift .086
Rico Jazz Select Filed 2M/2H

Tenor:
PMS Guardala MB .116
Vandoren V16 3
 

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I'm seeing about a 0.020 difference between my tenor and alto setups. I think that's fairly common.

Alto:
Philtone Rift .086
Rico Jazz Select Filed 2M/2H

Tenor:
PMS Guardala MB .116
Vandoren V16 3
I think jazz players may tend to prefer greater tip opening differences, especially if they like a very large opening on tenor. For classical playing, I agree with the Paul Coats article cited by the OP that the difference for mouthpieces that feel and play similarly will be in the range of 0.010 to 0.015. I normally play 0.066 on alto and 0.080 on tenor.
 

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It's my experience that if you like a certain size on tenor, the size that you'll like on alto will be around .020" less than that, and likewise the size that you will feel pretty immediately comfortable on on soprano will be about .020" less than what you like on alto.

So for a tenor player who likes a .100" tip, he'll feel pretty comfy at .080" on alto most of the time. Likewise on soprano, a guy who likes .080" tips on alto will feel pretty comfortable around .060" more of the time.

These all vary a little here and there of course, but for the most part I've found it to be true for myself at least, and for most guys who I do mouthpiece work for.
 

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I don't know if there's any correlation. I play a bigger tip on soprano than I do on alto, for example, and the mouthpieces are completely different; slim metal on alto and full-size hard rubber on soprano. There's just no logic in trying to pre-determine the mouthpiece based on what you use on a different sax - each horn has its own requirements and resistance is not always in a linear relationship with tip opening or facing length. I do some dual saxes, alto and tenor, so, yes, there are special requirements there as to mouthpiece physical size and resistance but that is obviously a special case that has nothing to do with playing the instruments one at a time. That reminds me - there's also no benefit in playing the same type of mouthpiece (similar shapes) on the different saxes unless you also do duals. Your embouchure gets used to playing different-type mouthpieces on the different horns, so you could play a Guardala on tenor and a Berg HR on bari and they both feel 'right' on those horns. Its actually like playing a regular mouthpiece on clarinet and a slim metal on tenor; you wouldn't have any trouble with that after you got used to it and its a switch made routinely all over the world. Each different kind of mouthpiece becomes 'right' for that particular instrument and your embouchure 'remembers' every time you switch instruments.
 
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