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Discussion Starter #1
I keep seeing some older horns shown as Martin-Yanagisawa stencil. From what I do know the horn would have been made by Yani but for Martin. But what I don't know is what did they do different? Or did they do anything different other than having another name on it?
 

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The saxes really weren't made for "Martin", as Martin had already gone out of business by that time. However, Leblanc owned the Martin name and the saxes were made for Leblanc and Leblanc put the Martin name on them. No changes (other than the engraving) were done to the saxes - they are the same as the corresponding Yani sax model - usually an 800 or an 880.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Fred said:
The saxes really weren't made for "Martin", as Martin had already gone out of business by that time. However, Leblanc owned the Martin name and the saxes were made for Leblanc and Leblanc put the Martin name on them. No changes (other than the engraving) were done to the saxes - they are the same as the corresponding Yani sax model - usually an 800 or an 880.
Okay, so it the same horn build and quality wise, but why did they produce the same sax that they were already selling with the name of a company that was out of business? Were they selling them at a different price? And how does that effect resale value today?
 

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i wastold they produced these horns under different names to help get around the import duty ie how many they were allowed to import into different countries
now days the import laws have changed allowing more into the country
 

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Martin/Yanis, like most older Yanis, are great players. Their lesser market value is only a matter of their lesser recognition and demand. Fear not.
 

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There was also the issue of Leblanc wanting to be able to provide a pro level sax to their dealers and their customers without having to manufacture one themselves.
 

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I had heard (similar to the above) that by branding it with an 'American" brand, Leblanc did not have to pay any duties, as this was an American product manufactured overseas (before that became commonplace and they closed the loopholes in the laws).
 

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I believe the reason was that the Martin name was much better known at that time. With the exception of "Selmer", the American brand names were the most respected in the broader American market. As we know, much like the Detroit automakers, they pissed the decades of "goodwill" away.

As I recall, the (Yani)Martins were very highly regarded "back in the day".:cool:
 

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I had a Martin/Yani tenor back in the 80s that I regret getting rid of....it was a great horn!
 

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I'm just stumbling on this now. So the Martin in the 80s was just a stencil of Yani? Like, the Yani S800 would be identical to the Martin S800?
 

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I have a Yanagasawa 880 and my mate has the Martin Yanagasawa. Hard put to find any difference except mine is earlier and has a plastic G# key whilst his seems to be metal.
 
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