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Hello everyone!

I'm checking out a Martin Indiana tenor online and the seller said it was a Martin Indiana "RMC" tenor sax. I am clueless on what "RMC" means. Could someone provide me with some info on what this means? Thanks!
 

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Richards Music Company. It just means it was made after the acquisition of Martin by RMC. In the case of Martin, everything I've read indicates that the acquisition did not have any notable effects on quality.
 

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I thought RMC meant Roundtable of Musical Craftsmen

From the Martin Story Site
http://www.themartinstory.net/version7/whatyou-company-info.php

“ In 1961, Paul Richards formed the Richards Music Corporation, by merging Martin, Blessing and Reynolds,
(In this periode Martins carry a the RMC marking, which officially stands for Roundtable of musical Craftsmen, NOT (officially) for Richards Music Corporation) “


and

https://contemporacorner.com/company/history/

As a division of Richards Music, Reynolds became part of the “Roundtable of Musical Craftsmen” (RMC) along with the Martin Band Instrument Co., E.K. Blessing and Flat/Jacks Drums (all owned by Richards Music Corporation). Instruments produced by these companies during the Richards era all bear a RMC shield logo.

and

http://www.drobnakbrass.com/index.php/research/other-makers/martin/

I came across some Martin instruments in the Holton Factory Reference Collection. Several are unmarked, and most are believed to be prototypes. A couple are marked "RMC" for Roundtable of Musical Craftsmen, though commonly known for the Richards Music Corporation.
 

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Mil; you are totally correct. The 'Music Man' models were made under the RMC badge. These later CIIIs are highly sought-after along with the 'Magna' from the same period. I haven't had my hands on an Indiana from that period but I would have no reason to suspect lower performance because it was an RMC. Here's my old RMC Music Man, #212xxx. I sold it to a dealer some time back but whoever got it got a monster.
See the RMC 'shield'.

 

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I thought RMC meant Roundtable of Musical Craftsmen

From the Martin Story Site
http://www.themartinstory.net/version7/whatyou-company-info.php

“ In 1961, Paul Richards formed the Richards Music Corporation, by merging Martin, Blessing and Reynolds,
(In this periode Martins carry a the RMC marking, which officially stands for Roundtable of musical Craftsmen, NOT (officially) for Richards Music Corporation) “


and

https://contemporacorner.com/company/history/

As a division of Richards Music, Reynolds became part of the “Roundtable of Musical Craftsmen” (RMC) along with the Martin Band Instrument Co., E.K. Blessing and Flat/Jacks Drums (all owned by Richards Music Corporation). Instruments produced by these companies during the Richards era all bear a RMC shield logo.

and

http://www.drobnakbrass.com/index.php/research/other-makers/martin/

I came across some Martin instruments in the Holton Factory Reference Collection. Several are unmarked, and most are believed to be prototypes. A couple are marked "RMC" for Roundtable of Musical Craftsmen, though commonly known for the Richards Music Corporation.
OK, I'm sorry, I had the story backwards, I thought the myth was that it stood for "Roundtable" and that the fact was "Richards".

Anyway, the point I was trying to make was that, according to everything I've read, and the few Martin saxophones I've tried out, the presence or absence of "RMC" just means before or after the acquisition/merger, but does not mean anything as to quality. Unlike some other acquisitions, my understanding is that Martin saxophone quality was unaffected by the change to Richards. It seems to me (from limited info) that Martin never got as much (or at all) into the "student-ization" and cost reduction of their horns as Buescher (under Selmer ownership) and Conn (under multiple ownerships) in the 1960s and 1970s. I've played one or two very late production Martins, where the engraving was very rudimentary for example, yet the general quality of the instrument seemed consistent with older ones.

I suppose that meant Martin (and King? Seems like late Super 20s were pretty good too) was at a disadvantage price-wise against Conn and the Selmer-owned Buescher/Bundy, in the time when "Professional Saxophone" got redefined to mean "Selmer Paris and ONLY Selmer Paris", and where "Any brand other than Selmer Paris" got redefined as "crappy student horn". So Conn was selling genuinely crappy student horns, and so was Selmer/Buescher/Bundy, and Martin and King couldn't charge professional prices for what continued to be professional horns, because everyone thought they were just overpriced crappy student horns, so Martin and King essentially went out of business as saxophone manufacturers.

At least, that's my take on it, as someone who was semi-aware of saxophone selling from about 1978 on. It would be interesting to get perspective from people who were in the business during the "guitars take over the world, saxophone market shrinks to a pale fraction of what it was before, only a few survive" period of roughly 1965 to 1985.
 

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I play a Martin Official Music Man tenor which I bought new in '63. (See my handle.) It's a great horn. I used to own an RMC alto, which I eventually sold and got a Martin Handcraft alto. I also have a 50's The Martin bari. 1saxman, those pix of your (ex) Martin Official Music Man are gorgeous. That's what mine looked like many years ago. Are those pix from a few years ago or of the horn when it was new?

As others have said, the RMC marking does not mean that the horn is of lesser quality. Indianas were marketed as student models, but Martin aficionados know that they are every bit as good as other Martins. Martins are sometimes called the poor man's Selmer.

To Jazzsaxy123, what's the asking price of the tenor you see online? If it's within reason, go for it. You may have to put a few hundred into it to get it into top playing condition so figure that in, but the basic horn is worth the investment if the asking price is not too high. In really good condition, it should be a killer horn. Is there a return policy? If not, you're taking a chance. But again, it's a chance worth taking if the price is reasonable. What's reasonable? I dunno. Offer $1000.
 

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Martin had a very constant output of great quality. I owned a Martin the Martin RMC which had nickel silver keys pretty much like the Magnas which were, without any doubt, among of the best saxophones ever made.
 

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Ahem. If anyone sees a Magna tenor for sale, let me know.
 

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Just had the Music Man out to run through Tequila and Shake A Tail Feather for upcoming gig. Took some pix so you could see the RMC engraving. It's 57 years old and killer. A friend (also on SOTW) heard and played the horn at my house and went out and got himself one.
View attachment 238872

View attachment 238874
 

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The sax is listed for $450. There is a "Make an offer" option. It looks to be in great cosmetic shape though. The seller states that he knows nothing about saxes and the seller's return policy states that returns are accepted only if the horn is damaged once it has arrived. I'm not sure if I'll go for it though. It'd be nice to try it out before making a purchase. $450 is a fantastic price, especially for a horn in decent shape. @MartinMusicMan
 

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The sax is listed for $450. ... $450 is a fantastic price, especially for a horn in decent shape. @MartinMusicMan
Yes. Buy it.

Edit: even if you have to put another $500 into it, you still have a very good horn for less than a grand.
 

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I did the same, I bought a 'cheap' The Martin tenor that needed complete revision, found a good repair person, spent the money and time on getting it repaired and now have a perfect instrument. Two things to consider, besides what MartinMusicMan wrote: (1) you will not have the instrument immediately - depending on your repair technician's schedule and preferences, it can take weeks/months to get your saxophone and (2) unless you spend an insane amount of money, your sax will still look vintage, it will not look new and shiny. If you do not mind these things, then go for it.
 

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By the way, are the Magnas any different besides cosmetically e.g. bell insignia)?
I have a 1959 Comm III and besides curiosity can't think of a reason why I'd need another tenor.
 
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