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This showed up in the mail today. I thought it was an old Martin stencil tenor, but it's rather small. Turns out it's a C Melody!
On the bell it says "Standard Professional" with some flowery engraving, the serial number is 24XXX and says Low Pitch below that.
It's really clean and sounds a lot like my other old Martin "tenor". I have been wanting a C Melody anyway.
I'm looking for more info about about it. It seems like a nice old horn.
 

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I'd found that article but didn't read it all the way through in the excitement having a new horn in the family. There's a lot of good information in there. I suppose I will have to investigate the intonation find what mouthpiece(s) work with it in that regard. It came with a piece that resembles a Yamaha 4C clone, but is smaller than a tenor piece. The Rovner style ligature was way too small for a "normal mouthpiece". I put my Ebolin tenor mouthpiece on it and it responded with the same full sound I get on my Indiana tenor with that piece.

There was a link on the bottom of that page to another page called the C Saxophone Archive http://ctenorsax.blogspot.com/ Several old videos and more info that I will have to dig into.
 

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Hello....I have a Martin Stencil C Melody Saxophone. It is marked as a Wurlitzer. Mine has many of the same features your horn does (most notably, the G# lever design). I was fortunate enough to purchased mine with relatively new pads, a more modern, wood hard-shell case, the stock mpc as well as a FAXX mpc (made by Ralph Morgan) and some useable reeds. I did not have to put any money into it to make it playable. I also happened to have a German made Bb Tenor mpc that made a great Jazz sound with the horn. Congrats on your purchase. If you want to explore mpc options, look at some of the Alto ones as well as the Tenor ones (and of course, the C Melody ones). I personally believe most C Melodys have the heart and soul of a Tenor and not an Alto. In that respect, I tend to call my horn a C Tenor (like our fellow British Sax players out there). Whatever is the case for you, take on this new challenge seriously because, the C Tenor is a serious and beautiful sounding instrument on its own merits. Have fun !!!
 
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