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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys

I got this Mark VI tenor neck from my tech to try out on my VI. He salvaged it from a horn, that was run over by a car but he doesn't know what serial it was. Anyone can guess from the pictures? It sounds to me like a later serial, very even low resistance and on the brighter side of things.

Thank you so much for your help!

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Its probably gonna be hard to nail down a year.

From what I understand (and it could be internet lore) French VI necks were not numbered. It was instead a practice in Elkhart with American horns and American assembled horns.

Also later on it is reported that Elkhart stopped the practice.

Though matching serials make a difference in value there is no one, to my knowledge, that ever illustrated that someone sat around finding the absolute best neck for each horn. My gut feeling is they put a neck on a horn, put a serial on them because people were used to them and to insure the right kind of neck stayed with the right horn. I would bet its more about inventory control than sonic matching. It would be an interesting bit of trivia to know.
 

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Hey guys

I got this Mark VI tenor neck from my tech to try out on my VI. He salvaged it from a horn, that was run over by a car but he doesn't know what serial it was. Anyone can guess from the pictures? It sounds to me like a later serial, very even low resistance and on the brighter side of things.

Thank you so much for your help!

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Later VI necks didn't have any serial numbers. It's probably post 1970. Phil Barone
 

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The serial number cut-off was about 140000, 1967. This neck is in the late profile so it could be either from a non-USA market horn (French) from around 1963 to 1974 or a USA-market horn post 140000. It could also be a Selmer Paris MK VI replacement neck from 1963 to 1974. These were sold in the USA by Selmer, USA. Looks to be in pretty good shape although I believe the blue paint in the 'S' is the wrong tint and was done post-manufacture. This really has no effect on value or anything else.
 

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The key looks high above the receiver for older tenors. I don’t think the activator key on my old Mark VI would reach it.
It’s probably a newer replacement. I have a replacement Mark VI neck like this that I use on a Balanced Action tenor. It has better focus and more edge than my other neck.
 

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I think you are right 1saxman...the blue looks a bit off.

mine has none but its a relaq and I dont care:)
Mostly the USA-market horns through Elkhart did not have the blue paint after the early '60s. The Euro-market ones did always have it.
 

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The key looks high above the receiver for older tenors. I don’t think the activator key on my old Mark VI would reach it.
It’s probably a newer replacement. I have a replacement Mark VI neck like this that I use on a Balanced Action tenor. It has better focus and more edge than my other neck.
It is correct and exactly like my 1971 original MK VI neck. I had one of the replacement necks too and the bottom of the rocker was a little higher. Your replacement neck might be a non-replacement or an earlier version.
 

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'Your replacement neck might be a non-replacement or an earlier version.'


Even I have to admit that was a strange sentence. I mean, it might be an original neck from another sax or an earlier version of the replacement neck, like from the '70s.
 

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The profile on tenor Mark VI varied during the years.

Early Selmer neck (till early Six Digits) horns have a lower profile and smaller bore.
The "base" where the octave key is screwed has changed as well: on later Mark VI was a kind of solid block drilled. Before, it was a plate with tube welded above.

You neck is sure from the first "switch"... so made after 1963/1964 (or whenever they made they made the first variation on tenor necks).

If the "base" is a solid block (like you find on Mark 7 and Series I necks...), it can be a neck from late 60's or later.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just seeing this, so sorry for not responding! Thanks everybody for chiming in, very helpful. It was taken of a wrecked euro MVI to which it most probably was original. The way it played made me suspect a later vintage. I ended up not buying it even though I could have had it for 500 bucks. This would be a good deal I suppose?
 

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$500 is a good deal I think. It's definitely pre-1967 given the octave saddle shape, but can't narrow it down any more than that. No serial doesn't indicate a year since Euro horns don't have serials anyway. Key being above the receiver doesn't necessarily say much, since that can be bent up or down for the clearance to the octave lever.
 
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