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Discussion Starter #1
Is there such a club here? I did a search and nothing turned up.

Please respond to this thread ONLY if you're a Mark VI soprano owner or supporter.

Enough has been said about other sopranos (esp modern ones) that are superior.
But nobody seems to mention that the beauty and the warmth of the tone of a Mark VI sop is almost totally superior to modern sops out there.

Keywork is always mentioned as an issue but people seem to forget...that the keywork of the modern sops are all modeled after the alto/tenor keywork (hint: look at the RH pinky table that juts out like a sore thumb) and that they make 'doubling' easier for alto/tenor players. The Mark VI sop is unique in that respect...although alto/tenor players feel that the 'outdated' keywork feels smallish to their hands.

Anyway I hope to get this 'club' started.
I know there are many VI sop players here...so please STAND UP and get this goin'.
 

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The action on the Mark VI soprano is second to none. Beautiful horn, and lighter than most modern sopranos--WITHOUT giving up on a great sound (there's another thread discussing weight of sopranos, and my Mark VI is lighter than all).
 

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I have a 1970s mark VI and, like Segaleon, a yanagisawa SC992. Both are excellent horns, can't decide which one has the better sound, both are great soundwise, and any difference from the players perspective is probably more related to the curved bell. The action on the SC992 is very good, IMHO probably a little better than the MkVI. 95% of the times I end up playing the SC992, probably mostly because I like playing the curved soprano ergonomically and because it looks fun, but also the SC992 is great in all other aspects.
 

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I've had two. A silver-plated 177000 and now I have a lacquered one that is 303000. I never liked the silver plated horn and dumped it for a good price and tried a few before I bought the one I have now. I like the key lay out of the Mark VI mostly because it makes me approach the soprano as a completely different horn than the tenor.
I guess growing up listening to Coltrane and Steve Grossman play soprano has something to do with my preference for a Mark VI with a Selmer metal mouthpiece.
 

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I've got a 30.... series sop. I've had it about 15 years. I had a few before that I let go. The best was one I bought new in 78..that was a beautiful horn with great tone and intonation.I wish I'd kept. I never get bored with the V1 sop. Complex and satisfying. I put it away for a bit when I bought a silver plate Series 3 but when I got it out again the V1 blew me away all over again so I sold the 3. I play mine with a Selmer metal piece too and also a rubber Soloist. Growing up with Trane and John Surman it's what I hear in a soprano so it's the way to go for me.
 

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I think the club idea would be great!! I have owned a 1981 silver-plated VI for 2 years (324000) that plays sweet. It replaced a LaSax that I used for 5+ years, which was easy to play and had a good intonation, but the VI was a in a class of its own. I will never part with my VI.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks guys.
So can I assume that this is THE formal thread for the M6 Sop Club?
Admin please advise.....
 

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But nobody seems to mention that the beauty and the warmth of the tone of a Mark VI sop is almost totally superior to modern sops out there.
To modern sopranos, yes, I feel my VI is superior to them in beauty and warmth of tone. But to be honest, my vintage Buescher has my VI beat in this department.

My VI soprano is rather rare, as it's an original black lacquered model. It was a special order by its late, original owner; who special ordered it along with a matching black lacqered VI sopranino... which I've also got.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
To modern sopranos, yes, I feel my VI is superior to them in beauty and warmth of tone. But to be honest, my vintage Buescher has my VI beat in this department.

My VI soprano is rather rare, as it's an original black lacquered model. It was a special order by its late, original owner; who special ordered it along with a matching black lacqered VI sopranino... which I've also got.
Yeah the only other sop I love is a late series TT Buescher.
But in terms of intonation stability, I think the later VIs have a slight edge.
A design modification was made to the neck.

I love my VI sop.
Fully repadded and set up by the Number One soprano tech in Japan, from Ishimori.
 

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My Vl was the most out of tune saxophone I have ever encountered. The G octave was 50-60 cents sharp, and I was forced to cork up the F# tone hole. It has a fine and colorful tone, but so does my Yanagisawa 900, which is a far superior instrument.
 

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To modern sopranos, yes, I feel my VI is superior to them in beauty and warmth of tone. But to be honest, my vintage Buescher has my VI beat in this department.

My VI soprano is rather rare, as it's an original black lacquered model. It was a special order by its late, original owner; who special ordered it along with a matching black lacqered VI sopranino... which I've also got.
Grumps

I'd love to see a photo!
 

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My Vl was the most out of tune saxophone I have ever encountered. The G octave was 50-60 cents sharp, and I was forced to cork up the F# tone hole. It has a fine and colorful tone, but so does my Yanagisawa 900, which is a far superior instrument.
The more you can push the mouthpiece on to a sax, the better it sounds. I have a Yanagisawa tenor I use as a back-up and they make good stuff, but to quote somebody on here, they look and feel like "agricultural equipment" compared to Selmer saxes.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
They both should still be on www.saxpics.com in the Selmer VI photo section. Just look for the colored horns.
I just went there and saw those pics! Wow! Never knew that a Mark VI could be black! Good for you, Grumps. Very cool.
 

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I've had two silver plated Mk6 sopranos and adored them both. My first one had a top F# and I played it for over 20 years; it got trashed on a gig in Spain so I had it repaired but it was never the same so I sold it to a friend who was cool about it's history. The replacement was excellent too but had no top F# which is a problem for someone who plays mostly classical music, so I sold that and bought a S3 which, ten years on, I still play.

The S3 is just no match for the Mk6s, with the rather fundamental exception that it is a more stable instrument than either of the Mk6s I had. The S3 weighs a ton, burbles at the bottom (if I'm not careful), cracks at the top (if I'm not careful) and has nowhere near the delicacy or subtlety of the Mk6s.

I visited the Selmer showroom in Paris a few years ago as a Selmer Artist (to choose a Ref Alto) and had a long discussion with the Artist Liaison about Selmer's plans to produce a Ref Soprano; it was definitely in the works however, nothing has materialized as yet! I wonder if it ever will!
 

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I've either owned or do own about every soprano out there.... (mark vi, yamaha 62s, yamaha 62rs, yamaha 675s, yamaha 875, yani sc902' yani sc992, yani s992/991, rampone curvy in gold-plate and silver, rampone saxello in silver, vintage conn curvy (silver) and beuscher true tone gold plate..... And I keep coming back to the vi for the warmth/color and delicate response in sound. However... I will say that I am very blown away by the rampone and cazzannis that I've owned... They are very easy to play and have great ergo's and if you closed your eyes you would not know that you were not listening to a vintage horn. Beautifully crafted too but they are heavier like the modern horns so I just feel more comfortable on my vi.
 

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I just went there and saw those pics! Wow! Never knew that a Mark VI could be black! Good for you, Grumps. Very cool.
A DC jazz player who took a gig playing piano for a modern dance class my mother used to run died about thirty years ago. His family found out that my mother had a son who played saxophone, so they were flat out given to me when I graduated high school. I've cherished them since.
 

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I have a 238 XXX Mark VI soprano but I don't play it much these days because it needs an overhaul and I don't have the money right now.

The intonation isn't as bad as some make out to be.
 
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