Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a beautiful original Mark VI soprano, SN 268xxx. It's all original with the exception of 1 or 2 pads I had replaced when I bought the horn 20 years ago. The original lacquer is probably 98%. I'm not a pro player, but want this sax to be 100% its potential. I'm beginning to have trouble hitting some of the highs and lows. At >40 years old, I'm sure the pads have seen better days. I suspect they are beginning to leak. I'm playing in my daughter's wedding in November and am looking to put it perfect condition. This is were I'm looking for advice.

1. Should I simply have the pads replaced and everything adjusted/regulated OR should I go farther with it and have the tone holes all leveled?

2. Should I have my local shop do the work or send it to one of the more renowned technicians? My local shop is Buddy Rogers in Cincinnati. Yesterday I dropped it off for inspection by Scott Snyder. From what I understand, they have an excellent reputation, but can I expect them to have the expertise to make this horn to be 100%? I've been watching Matt Stohrer's videos and would love to have someone like that go over my horn. But, is that really necessary on a horn still in excellent condition? Besides, I understand he's not taking new clients.

What would you recommend and who would you recommend I have do it?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
825 Posts
There's a difference between a pad job and a mechanical rebuild. Many of the local shops say they do a rebuild and charge you for it & then just do a pad job. That being said, some of the major shops might tell you your horn needs a rebuild when you don't need it.

If the horn has sealed well in the past (aside from just needing a couple pads that were worn), then why would you need to mess with the tone holes?
A good shop would check the tone holes anyway when they get the horn disassembled.
But you have to count on them being honest. They could tell you you need body alignment, post alignment, key swedging, tone hole leveling, post alignment, screw replacement/rethread etc, etc,. you could spend thousands...
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,348 Posts
I recently acquired two older sopranos from an estate - a '27 Conn NWII and a '59 five-digit Selmer Mark VI. I took both of them to a local repairman in my town and had him (a no-name guy) do overhauls. I left it up to him about what to do with the horns beyond re-padding. Together we chose the pads and the resonators to be used. Both horns turned out to be the best sopranos I'd ever played.

If you know your local guy and he wants to do the work, I'd say go with it and don't worry about it. Shipping a horn across the country for this kind of work can be problematic. I've done it twice, once good, once not so good. There are no guarantees anyway, so I'd prefer to keep it local. Opinions will vary. DAVE
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
825 Posts
I recently acquired two older sopranos from an estate - a '27 Conn NWII and a '59 five-digit Selmer Mark VI. I took both of them to a local repairman in my town and had him (a no-name guy) do overhauls. I left it up to him about what to do with the horns beyond re-padding. Together we chose the pads and the resonators to be used. Both horns turned out to be the best sopranos I'd ever played.

If you know your local guy and he wants to do the work, I'd say go with it and don't worry about it. Shipping a horn across the country for this kind of work can be problematic. I've done it twice, once good, once not so good. There are no guarantees anyway, so I'd prefer to keep it local. Opinions will vary. DAVE
yeah I agree w/ that. Would avoid shipping a horn like that if possible.
 

·
Distinguished Technician & SOTW Columnist. RIP, Yo
Joined
·
17,204 Posts
A good shop will be honest with you, and present the options for making the horn play at its best and reliably.
Those last two words can mean a whole heap more expertise and work is needed.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top