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So earlier today I was polishing my Mk VI 81xxx alto and I found something very odd. Under the side f key above side c there is the letter "B" stamped into the bottom of it... Then after looking at that I looked under the key on my 206xxx Mk VI tenor and nothing. Is the stamp some sort of old selmer pre whenever quality control or is my alto just even more special?
 

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I think it's just a batch number. It might be for a certain key design. I've got a G on some of my keys. (later serial number)
 

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So earlier today I was polishing my Mk VI 81xxx alto and I found something very odd. Under the side f key above side c there is the letter "B" stamped into the bottom of it... Then after looking at that I looked under the key on my 206xxx Mk VI tenor and nothing. Is the stamp some sort of old selmer pre whenever quality control or is my alto just even more special?
The stamp underneath the side E key was an indication of instrument quality. 'B' was used to indicate blemished or B grade instruments - the fact that you get an F when you use that key is proof of this fact.

I just looked underneath the side E key on my 82XXX alto, and there is a letter K. 'K' was used to mark instruments that had a special Karma - that very special MKVI quality that is usually only found in 82XXX MKVI's.
 

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The stamp underneath the side E key was an indication of instrument quality. 'B' was used to indicate blemished or B grade instruments - the fact that you get an F when you use that key is proof of this fact.

I just looked underneath the side E key on my 82XXX alto, and there is a letter K. 'K' was used to mark instruments that had a special Karma - that very special MKVI quality that is usually only found in 82XXX MKVI's.
My 83xxx has an 'R' so this must mean 'really really good?!'
 

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Nice saxes.
 

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He who laughs last gets it.
 

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I have a Mark VI tenor, 88xxx, Feb 1961.
Under the key of low C, says G.
The R in the bell is the Registered Trade Mark
 

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I just worked on 2 consecutive numbers VI tenors. On the underside of the high E key one has "22" stamped and the other zip, nada. The later one (the 101) has some G's around. The 100 had other letter that I can't recall now.
 

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I have a "G" stamped on the low C# key of my 107xxx tenor.
 

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Ok....now I get it....you're just a funny guy. Ha ha ha. ;)
Sorry Jaared, I missed you posts in this thread because all my time was going on reading the ''thing'' thread!

Yes, of course I was joking....... I have no idea what all those letters or numbers mean!
 

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they are part and batch numbers (or letters). Mike F's earlier post has the best available information on these...
 

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If I had to fashion a guess I would say it identified who assembled the horn. If there were problems they would want to know who did it.
 

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If I had to fashion a guess I would say it identified who assembled the horn. If there were problems they would want to know who did it.
In that case, if the workers were smart, they'd stamp someone else's letter/number! :twisted:
 

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In that case, if the workers were smart, they'd stamp someone else's letter/number! :twisted:
Why would they do that? If the horn sounded and played awesome, the credit would go to someone else.
 

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Why would they do that? If the horn sounded and played awesome, the credit would go to someone else.
Exactly, pride in workmanship was and is still alive in some companies.
 

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.................................... If there were problems they would want to know who did it.

In that case, if the workers were smart, they'd stamp someone else's letter/number! :twisted:
I apologise for my poor sense of humour!
 

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Why would they do that? If the horn sounded and played awesome, the credit would go to someone else.
Mike has a point. If nobody outside Selmer knows the meaning of the letters, they would only get Selmer's attention drawn to them when someone returns a lemon.
 
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