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Discussion Starter #1
Picked up a late silver plated Mark VI alto for about 2000usd today. Needs a complete overhaul and the neck tenon fixing but figured I was unlikely I would lose money on it in any case. I don't have any experience with silver plated horns and was wondering if anyone could let me know wether the finish is original.

Photos are here:

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1M0E_l7DDW48g2TOJ3qWiS0QiT9tVTS8Z

Any other info welcome.

Thanks
 

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Well, I'm not going to sign in to look at a picture but all the silver plated Mark 6s I've seen (not that many) are a bright finish, not matte like the older US horns.

Is there some reason why you question whether the finish is original? As far as I know although it wasn't all that common, silver plate was always offered by Selmer (I am by no means an expert on Selmer saxes).
 

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Looks original to me. Original finish is more of an issue with relacquers as it was commonplace to relacquer as part of an overhaul and instruments got over-buffed.

The one in the pics has had a knock to the low D# post. It may need a bit of work to get it in good order.
 

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The only aspect that looks possibly unoriginal is the bell to bow bracing--is it me or are the little vertical lines buffed out and shallow? Could also just be the lighting.
 

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Replating , in silver, any horn would be a very expensive operation and fill all the parts like serial numbers and engraving (unless they are recut afterwards), besides, some folks hold the wrong impression that silver plate finish does something to the sound so plating a non plated horn would be detrimental to value.

Silver plate was an incredibly popular option until the ’80 at least in the north of Europe, used by the better marching bands. In the U.S. Silverplating was mandatory for example in the Navy and some horns that were especially made for them are also identified as such.

Nevertheless it is not unheard of. I had a transitional Conn which was replated at some point, when these things were not as expensive as they are now.

I always had to think of that girl who came to try a Mark VI that I ad for sale and said that one could feel under the fingers the disproportionate thickness of the plating ( sic! the whole just few microns of it!) showing how much stupid prejudice can be in the way of reason.

Your horn is original but shows the typical tarnish and wear of a silverplate saxophone. It would need to be completely disassebled and be taken care of, the level of the outcome will determine the cost.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Yeah the lines on the bell-bow bracing are clear on one side and unclear on the other but I attributed it to the plating being thicker there for whatever reason. The other brace they are clear all around as is the engraving/stamp on the bell and serial number etc.

Yeah sending it to my repair person for a complete restoration, but got it for so little that there was very little risk in acquiring this sax.
 

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Yeah the lines on the bell-bow bracing are clear on one side and unclear on the other but I attributed it to the plating being thicker there for whatever reason. The other brace they are clear all around as is the engraving/stamp on the bell and serial number etc.

Yeah sending it to my repair person for a complete restoration, but got it for so little that there was very little risk in acquiring this sax.
Plating thickness is only a couple microns so it wouldn't be due to that. Could be just that just the ring was replated? Everything else looks original. $2000 is a steal regardless.
 
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