Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
490 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Someone told me that the mark 7 was build strong especially for travellers ....can you see that in the sax ?

Heavy ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
Well, the MK VII has a well-designed body-to-bell brace, and it even might be a few ounces heavier than some horns, but, for travelling, I think it all gets down to the protection of the case.
For touring, see R&R cases.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,939 Posts
Someone told me that the mark 7 was build strong especially for travellers ....can you see that in the sax ?

Heavy ?
"Someone"? I'd love to hear that.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Joined
·
4,901 Posts
To destroy them, one must endeavor the perils of venturing to the fires from which they were forged...
It's true. The entire thing was very anti-climatic though. My travels would have probably been more epic, if I didn't just ride that eagle to the volcano.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
14,268 Posts
A few ounces either way is no big deal even though some want to make something of it. I don't know that a MKVII is any different than an old Buescher TT or Conn 6M (name your favorite) as far as durability goes. My oldest daughter plays a MKVII alto I bought her new when she started high school - she is now in her mid-50's and the horn is great - and she plays it all the time in various bands, etc.

Don't believe the myths. DAVE
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,458 Posts
I don't have extensive experience with the Mark 7, but I do remember when our high school got a pair of brand new mark 7s, one alto, one tenor. We all fooled around with them to some extent and I remember the left hand keys were so huge that I couldn't play Bb (I was 17 years old at the time, not a small child). Our lead alto player worked with the alto for a couple months, was unable to get it to play reliably in tune, and went back to whatever he had been playing before that. I think our band director actually loaned him his personal Mark 6 alto, but I am not sure about that.

On the other hand, I played with a very fine tenor player who played the heck out of a Mark 7. Great sound and intonation. I will say, however, that he was a big guy with hands like a bunch of bananas.

Maybe the summary on the Mark 7 is something like: "Some are really good, some aren't, and it may work well for you or it may not."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,756 Posts
I heard the Mark VIIs were made from the brass of the rejected shell casings used during WWII whereas the Mark VI was made from the good shell casings. That is why most prefer the Mark VI.

:mrgreen:
 

·
SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
·
23,019 Posts
Maybe the summary on the Mark 7 is something like: "Some are really good, some aren't, and it may work well for you or it may not."
Sure, and that is not a myth*. Regarding the MKVII in general, I've never played one, but two of the best tenor players I've known personally play VIIs and sound fantastic on them. These players, one a woman who doesn't seem to have especially big hands, don't seem to have any problem with the ergos.

As to the OP's question, some tenors are a bit heavier than others, some are built a bit sturdier maybe, but any saxophone has to be transported in a sturdy case, well protected from getting bumped around, when traveling. None of them are immune to damage. So no, a MKVII is not built strong to travel; it still needs a good case, just like any other horn.

*Sacks gave a nice example of a 'myth.' LOL
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2015-
Joined
·
32,939 Posts
Regardless of how well a horn is built, a gig bag will negate it all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
I own a 24,000 series tenor with the M prefix whatever that means and it is built like a tank, blows great and sounds very close to my 1970 Mk 6. The 7s are great horns for half the price of a 6 but buy now if you find one as the prices are going up .
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top