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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys i need your help again. I'm in need of a alto mouthpiece for marching band. I want to stay around 100 dollars at most. I want something loud but not to edgy something thats fairly warm. Thanks
 

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Bari Playa said:
I'm in need of a alto mouthpiece for marching band.... I want something loud but not to edgy something thats fairly warm. Thanks
Why the hell would you even bother with marching band? I mean seriously, marching band is about playing loud. That's it. I don't care how many band dictators--I mean directors log on here and espouse the finer points of the deep "dramatic" and "musical" experience/social commentary that is marching band.

It's about playing loud raucous tunes to a stadium half full of sports nuts while the other half go **** and get more nachos and beer.

For marching band, you should be looking for the cheapest mouthpiece, which lets you plays as loud as you can, as easily as you can, which is so cheap that you don't care if it gets broken, stolen, or dumped on by some drunken football fan.

For me that meant my stock plastic Keilwerth 7* "jazz" mouthpiece with the highest baffle I've ever played on, and a medium Fibracell reed (on a Yamaha YAS 23 alto).

I could play easily with the synthetic reed without worrying about it going dry. I could (and DID) play ALL of my altissimo (even higher then the lead trumpet (they didn't like that much), and I could put enough air through my horn to keep up with the trumpet players. Yeah, the tone sounded like sh*t, but who really cared? No one. But they could hear the first alto part.

Find a plastic or metal mouthpiece with a large tip opening, and a large baffle, and find the reed that lets you lay it as loud as you can, while still maintaining enough control to embarrass the "high note" trumpet players.

Believe you me: no one at your football games is going to say to the person sitting next to them "wow, that seventh chair alto player has a really nice, warm, lush sound. I think I'll go to his jazz combo concerts just because I like his tone so much!"

[...."warm" marching band mouthpiece?! heh, LOL...]
 

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I was forced to use a Selmer C* on tenor in marching band at Rutgers in the late 70's. Dogma. At least we could pick our own reeds. We used hard ones and blew with lots of air.

Fortunately we could use whatever we wanted in Pep Band.
 

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me too -i used a selmer solost c* on a mk 6 alto (the schools horn!)
 

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JCBigler said:
Why the hell would you even bother with marching band? I mean seriously, marching band is about playing loud. That's it. I don't care how many band dictators--I mean directors log on here and espouse the finer points of the deep "dramatic" and "musical" experience/social commentary that is marching band.
For some of us there is no choice, as concert band and marching band are the same class...

I don't know if I would go with the loudest mouthpiece in the world thing either...though I would certainly suggest using a synthetic reed or a V16.
 

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Get a Runyon Custom, put the spoiler in, and throw on a fibracell

It'll be 'warm', and loud as hell and edgy. Now go knock down a wall
 

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Too bad metalites aren't around anymore, they're perfect for marching band. Loud, bright and indestructable.
 

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SpeckledLemon said:
For some of us there is no choice, as concert band and marching band are the same class...
Really? So, you're playing wind ensemble music in a concert band set up with chairs and stands on a marching band field? You don't have room in your sax case for an additional mouthpiece? Or another pocket in your pants to carry one? You're not using your good horn on the marching field are you?

I'm going to have to call shenanigans on this one. There's enough time between walking from the practice field to the rehearsal room to change mouthpieces. Every saxophone player who is playing in more than one type of ensemble should have a mouthpiece for that set up: classical, jazz, marching, etc... Yes that means having more than one mouthpiece. Yes that means doubling up if you are playing more than one saxophone (alto and tenor, etc...).

Suck it up. Don't let your band dictators tell you what kind of equipment you should be playing on. You need to make those decisions for yourself in consultation with your private teacher (the person who actually KNOWS how to play saxophone, not who just spent three weeks on saxophone in a woodwind pedagogy class ten more more years ago in college).
 

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maestroelite said:
Too bad metalites aren't around anymore, they're perfect for marching band. Loud, bright and indestructable.

Just get a really open graphonite and stick some plastic putty in the chamber.
 

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JCBigler said:
Don't let your band dictators tell you what kind of equipment you should be playing on. You need to make those decisions for yourself in consultation with your private teacher (the person who actually KNOWS how to play saxophone, not who just spent three weeks on saxophone in a woodwind pedagogy class ten or more years ago in college).

I agree, but what school lets students slide by with only 3 weeks?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
hey guys thanks for the help. and i do have multiple mouthpieces. i need one that's only gonna be used for marching and possibly jazz. thanks
 

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I still play the Vanduren A45 that I got for marching band back in college.
Loud enough for the field - and a good sounds for jazz band or whatever.
They work well with just about anything - though for outside I recommend fibracell or plasticover.

Oh yeah - and if you're playing outside - you don't want a metal mouthpiece..

(Ever get dared in the middle of winter to lick that steel flagpole?)
May not apply where you live (I didn't notice your location) but metal can do some nasty things to your face and teeth if you get hit - and things get really interesting if it gets near freezing outside..
 

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Carl H. said:
I agree, but what school lets students slide by with only 3 weeks?
Okay, maybe FOUR weeks, out of a standard sixteen week semester, You may spend four weeks on each of: flute, clarinet, saxophone, and if you are lucky you'll get to spend two weeks on oboe and bassoon.
 

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Carbs said:
Meyer 7 with a 2.5 Vandoren Blue Box reed. And that baby will scream
Scream? You want to scream?

Try a stainless steel Lawton 9 BB. Or maybe a Berg 100/0 with a Fibracell Soft. You'll p**s off the whole brass section of every school at any marching band contest in less than 3 1/2 seconds with that set up.

But then again, my original post suggested not putting any effort (or money) into your marching band mouthpiece. If you have multiple mouthpieces already, find the one that plays the loudest, and which you don't mind getting broken, stolen, lost, or confiscated by the trumpet line judge at the contest.

Like I said, marching band is about LOUD. Don't give a flying flip about the tone. Just play on the loudest/cheapest one possible.
 

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JCBigler said:
Really? So, you're playing wind ensemble music in a concert band set up with chairs and stands on a marching band field? You don't have room in your sax case for an additional mouthpiece? Or another pocket in your pants to carry one? You're not using your good horn on the marching field are you?

I'm going to have to call shenanigans on this one. There's enough time between walking from the practice field to the rehearsal room to change mouthpieces. Every saxophone player who is playing in more than one type of ensemble should have a mouthpiece for that set up: classical, jazz, marching, etc... Yes that means having more than one mouthpiece. Yes that means doubling up if you are playing more than one saxophone (alto and tenor, etc...).

Suck it up. Don't let your band dictators tell you what kind of equipment you should be playing on. You need to make those decisions for yourself in consultation with your private teacher (the person who actually KNOWS how to play saxophone, not who just spent three weeks on saxophone in a woodwind pedagogy class ten more more years ago in college).
Use some common sense. Once marching season is over...concert band for the rest of the year. And if you think I only have one mouthpiece, then what planet are you from?
 

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Bari Playa said:
and i do have multiple mouthpieces.
???

And which ones would those be? Maybe you should have started this thread off by mentioning which you already have, before asking for recommendations to go out and spend more money on marching band.
 

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I never said anything about changing mouthpieces...I was referring to why anyone would do marching band in the first place. I play bassoon in concert band.
 
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