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Discussion Starter #1
The G key in my curved soprano was not comfortable.
How to make it more comfortable?
I thought: "Do it yourself"!
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Since I started playing my Bauhaus-Walstein curved soprano, I've been quite satisfied.
But it soon turned out that one key - G key - is not very ergonomic for me, the G key is in the wrong place for me. My left ring finger was in the wrong position on it, the finger must have been unnaturally bent or ... it stuck out beyond the key too much and it have tendency to slip off, key edge cut into the fingertip. I also felt that it was a little too small. Not comfortable for me.
In tenor, alto, straight soprano and another cuved soprano I didn't have these problems - they were all comfortable, well positioned. So, I decided to make the G key of Bauhaus-Walstein curved soprano just as comfortable as in my other saxophones.
I didn't want to replace or cut the lever / key. I thought and decided to shape a special profile of two-component epoxy putty in black (the black color goes well with a few black elements in this saxophone). I chose modeling putty, as it's drying process is long enough to shape the right shape and after drying it is very hard.
I decided that the changes must be reversible, they should not destroy / damage nor the lever, nor the key with pearl inlay.
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What was the goal:
- to enlarge / extend the G key
- to add a profile that causes the finger will not have a tendency to slip.
So:
- I removed the G key lever
- I wrapped the G lever (and button) with black tape, precisely securing, so that you can cut off the tape fragment around key (around cup edge and pearl inlay at the end of work - after shaping, drying and sanding)
- I formed a "croissant" with two party epoxy putty
- I put putty around the lever at the edge of the "cup" and PATIENTLY shaped it until it reached the desired shape, I tried to integrate it into the profile defined by the key, the finger and the lever "curve" (in the final stage of shaping I "applied" the touch of a ring finger to fit "putty enhancer" exactly to the finger)
- then the "sculpture" dries 24 hours
- after that I sanded it with sandpaper (300-500-800-1000)
- then wiped and polished with a cloth and cork grease
- finally, I gently cut the sealing tape (the aesthetic aspect was also important to me).
Total execution time - about 3 hours, except for the 24h drying time.
I tried to make "enhancer" a natural extension of the pad. In fact, it went better than I could have expected.
What is the effect?
Great comfort, the finger goes where it is needed and does not slip off.
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Pictures below:
1. I took first photos after partial cut out of the protective tape, but the tape partly uncut is still visible on the lever and underneath the key.
2. Almost done.
3. Final photos - after work, no tape, key cleaned, extension finished.
 

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Looks good! I use sugru to make something similar on my horns, to keep my long pinky from flying off the low C key and give me more comfortable purchase on it. Modifications like these can work wonders!
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Looks good! I use sugru to make something similar on my horns, to keep my long pinky from flying off the low C key and give me more comfortable purchase on it. Modifications like these can work wonders!
I am glad that someone except me ;-) likes this work.
Yes, I also once felt discomfort playing on the lower C, on my current one it is good (on tenor and alto - more ergonomic, profile bent up, also on straight soprano is good).
Although on this curved soprano low C is quite flat, it could be more ergonomic, I do not understand why the designers in a fairly new model do not make this more finger friendly. Maybe I will correct this key as well? Thanks for the hint.
 
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