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I have recently purchase a new P. Mauriat PMXA-67r alto saxophone. When I tune to concert Bb, everything is perfectly in tune except for concert f, which goes 38 cents sharp. I cant find anything online, has anybody else dealt with this?

(Ive tested it on multiple mouthpieces, and it is the same.)
 

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Concert F (middle D) is always sharp on saxophone.You need to adjust by using embouchure or closing the low B key (but that changes the response/tone).
 

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No, you lower the low C key for a sharp D.
 

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Concert F (middle D) is always sharp on saxophone.You need to adjust by using embouchure or closing the low B key (but that changes the response/tone).
I actually never had much trouble with the tuning D2 on any of my horns (tone is another matter, D2 does tend to be a little quirky). For me it's usually B1, G#1 and 2, and C# (all three octaves).

Has your horn been checked out to make sure that all the cup heights are set properly? Maybe one of your bell keys is a little high.
 

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I actually never had much trouble with the tuning D2 on any of my horns (tone is another matter, D2 does tend to be a little quirky). For me it's usually B1, G#1 and 2, and C# (all three octaves).

Has your horn been checked out to make sure that all the cup heights are set properly? Maybe one of your bell keys is a little high.
You must be a wizard! Middle D is nearly always out of tune if one doesn't adjust for it. This is how the saxophone naturally plays.
 

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As previously stated, you can probably make a lot of progress by lowering the at-rest position of the low C key.

The felt bumper that the C key contacts when it's open can be screwed down into a lower position. This will require a large-blade screw-driver --or perhaps you could use a teaspoon handle or a quarter --or perhaps ask a tech to do it while-you-wait. Crank it down until the D is in tune OR until it starts making the low D stuffy and excessively flat. Chances are you will end up somewhere closer to 10-15 cents sharp and can then deal with that via embouchure/voicing. It's also possible to play D with the low B closed, but that tends to be a bit cumbersome (and stuffy-sounding).
 

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You must be a wizard! Middle D is nearly always out of tune if one doesn't adjust for it. This is how the saxophone naturally plays.
Either that or I've lucked out and my horns have been very-well adjusted. *Shrug* I just find there's other notes that I find much more difficult to keep in tune. I DO find that middle D tends towards being a slightly stuffy one way or another, tho.
 
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