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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Conn tenor and alto, each an M model (Naked lady). Both have areas where the lacquer has worn off.

What is the best way to maintain these areas of the horns?

I also have a Conn curved soprano silver finish 1917 horn (Chip) that is well weathered but in great shape structurally. This one is currently in the shop getting a repad.

I can post pics if needed of the worn areas of the Tenor (Maggie Mae) and the Alto (Bubba) if needed.

If this has already been covered I'm sorry, please direct me to the appropriate topic. (There is so much info on here it's overwhelming and incredible)

TIA

Barry
 

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Best you can do is keep them away from humidity. Not only by wiping those areas dry but also by letting the sax completely dry out after playing and before shutting its case closed, every time you play it.
 

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applying periodically a thin layer of wax (bee or carnauba but also synthetic would work) would help protecting the unlacquered area to tarnish.
 

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Wipe it each time you play, just like you swab the inside. Same thing.
I think we often forget the inside is unlaqured brass!
The only thing different on the outside is the oils from your skin.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you. I was thinking Carnauba but wasn't sure.
 

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Wipe it each time you play, just like you swab the inside. Same thing.
I think we often forget the inside is unlaqured brass!
The only thing different on the outside is the oils from your skin.
Yep, I sure did.
 

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Thank you. I was thinking Carnauba but wasn't sure.
Carnauba wax is a vegetal wax but essentially not any better or worse, to this purpose, than Bee鈥檚 wax.

A light application and then buffing with a cleaning cloth will give it a shine and protect.

If you want to darken it a bit (to match the lacquered spots) you may even consider using antique wax
 

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What I do when these bare brass areas get too red or green is to wipe them down the best I can with a rag and declare victory. There is no actual need to "maintain" them. In theory the corrosion that forms where the lacquer has come off could cause an issue. In reality that would take hundreds of years to come to pass, if ever.

Keeping your palm key pads replaced when they get brittle and start to leak is a much higher priority.
 

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Carnauba wax is a vegetal wax but essentially not any better or worse, to this purpose, than Bee鈥檚 wax...
Beeswax has a sticky feel - almost like an extremely thick grease.
Carnauba wax (on its own) is hard and non-sticky, more like stick shellac. (Many brands of carnauba have something like beeswax added, and some don't declare it.)

Museums use synthetic, polycrystalline Renaissance Wax, also called Museum Wax. My experience of it is somewhat sticky, which would not matter to a museum.

Lacquer has a lot going for it!
Otherwise I imagine (carnauba) car polish would be as good as most formulations.
 

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Honestly, if it were bothering me I think I would just give the exposed areas a polish with a mild polish, by hand, then clean with isopropyl alcohol, then mask off what needs to be masked off and shoot some clear lacquer on those areas. Heck, if you use common sense you wouldn't even need to do any more than minimal disassembly. This is what a lot of technicians do after a solder repair that scorches lacquer. It doesn't look original (but with the lacquer gone, it isn't original anyway) but it will greatly retard the redevelopment of tarnish on those areas. Of course this kind of spot repair won't last like a factory application or a proper re-lacquering done with complete disassembly, oven baking, etc., but how long do you need? 20 or 30 years? Should be good for that, anyway.
 
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