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I'm mainly a bari player (selmer series II), altho I recently was spending more time with my alto. Altissimo came a lot easier to me on alto and tenor than it ever did on bari, despite me being much better on bari in general. But I am back on the bari now, and I really want to get comfortable playing altissimo. And actually, playing alto did give me a big boost. I can play to about an octave above altissimo A and am really happy with how they sound and how they feel. But G3 is just a pain. I thought I was getting there on G, minus some intonation issues. But then I realised that what I was really doing was playing an F#, and pitching it up. This is because of the whole 'low A altissimo being a half step down' thing. I never realised it was a problem tho, because the G# fingerings actually play G#. I had always figured that the half step low A issue began on altissimo A because of that.

So until now, I was using basically the same fingerings on alto and bari (adjusting up a half step on bari). For Bb (A on bari) and above, I use the ring finger and octave key along with the palm keys. For G, I had been using (and still do on alto) 1 and 3 on left hand, 1 on right, and the bottom bis key. For G# I use the middle bis key. As I said, G# is the only note that plays the same on both horns. I have found one fingering that is ok on bari, octave key and front F. But its weak as hell and really doesn't want to speak. Any low A bari players have any thought on any other ways to get that G?
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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Of course I realize a serious bari player must be fluent in altissimo but as a doubler I'm much more concerned with intonation, projection and tone. Depending on my mouthpiece/reed set-up I can get the first few notes using the same fingerings as tenor and alto but very rarely go there when soloing.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2013
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That's interesting as a lot of people will say that Bari is the easier of the horns to get altissimo out of. The longer the tube the more prone to harmonics.

I've only ever played a bari once so I'm not an expert at this.

But for me practicing the overtones as a constant drone really opens up any horn that I get into my hands. 5 minutes and you'll start to feel how the horn voices (although you've been at it for a while on bari)

I still recommend it though. All the overtones you can get off low Bb but as a drone. Don't let any other partial notes creep their way in. You just want the pure overtone. Adjust your face and throat accordingly to banish those other notes. The longer you hold some of them the more likely other notes are to creep in.

Do this with all the bell keys and even low D and Eb.
 

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Forum Contributor 2015-17
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I'm mainly a bari player (selmer series II), altho I recently was spending more time with my alto. Altissimo came a lot easier to me on alto and tenor than it ever did on bari, despite me being much better on bari in general. But I am back on the bari now, and I really want to get comfortable playing altissimo. And actually, playing alto did give me a big boost. I can play to about an octave above altissimo A and am really happy with how they sound and how they feel. But G3 is just a pain. I thought I was getting there on G, minus some intonation issues. But then I realised that what I was really doing was playing an F#, and pitching it up. This is because of the whole 'low A altissimo being a half step down' thing. I never realised it was a problem tho, because the G# fingerings actually play G#. I had always figured that the half step low A issue began on altissimo A because of that.

So until now, I was using basically the same fingerings on alto and bari (adjusting up a half step on bari). For Bb (A on bari) and above, I use the ring finger and octave key along with the palm keys. For G, I had been using (and still do on alto) 1 and 3 on left hand, 1 on right, and the bottom bis key. For G# I use the middle bis key. As I said, G# is the only note that plays the same on both horns. I have found one fingering that is ok on bari, octave key and front F. But its weak as hell and really doesn't want to speak. Any low A bari players have any thought on any other ways to get that G?
Try L1 without the octave key. Tends sharp on my low a Yani, but is real easy:
 
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