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Irritating.

So, so irritating.

I don't seem to be playing my low, C#, B, or Bb well lately. When I play either of these notes it usually goes to the mid-register overtone.

A while ago, Jeff Goodspeed said in a master class that a problem like this might have something to do with a microleak in the higher register of your horn.

So, just wondering if you had any insight into what might be causing me this problem.

Because of this issue, I had to stop playing in my lower register so much. I even had to make sure my next three audition tunes didn't have C#, B, or Bb in them just so I wouldn't have to play them. I don't know what's going to happen when my auditioner tells me to play something that requires one or all of these three. (which reminds me, I have an audition at Saint Francis Xavier University next week. Kinda excited)

Insight?
 

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What you are experiencing with the poor response in the lowest notes is typical of a leaking saxophone. You definitely should have it gone through by a tech, preferably before you play an audition at a university. It will look bad if you cannot play the entire range of the instrument, and if you use the leaking sax as an excuse it will look bad because it will appear you do not care enough to keep your instrument in top playing condition. This is a no brainer, get your sax fixed!
 

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The usual culprit is your G# key adjustment.

The low C#, B and Bb all move the same mechanism that opens your G# key. You can test this by holding down your G# key to open it - then pressing down the F key to close it again. Then press lightly on your G# pad to see if it may be moving slightly. There should be an adjustment screw that controls how far down the G# pad cup is pressed down which should be obvious when you pressed the F key - try giving it a 1/4 turn clockwise and see if that helps.
 

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The usual culprit is your G# key adjustment.

The low C#, B and Bb all move the same mechanism that opens your G# key. You can test this by holding down your G# key to open it - then pressing down the F key to close it again. Then press lightly on your G# pad to see if it may be moving slightly. There should be an adjustment screw that controls how far down the G# pad cup is pressed down which should be obvious when you pressed the F key - try giving it a 1/4 turn clockwise and see if that helps.
Great diagnosis. Another test is to play a D and add the G# key. If the sound changes, the G# is out of adjustment. A leak light is helpful when doing this adjustment as well.
 

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The usual culprit is your G# key adjustment.

The low C#, B and Bb all move the same mechanism that opens your G# key. You can test this by holding down your G# key to open it - then pressing down the F key to close it again. Then press lightly on your G# pad to see if it may be moving slightly. There should be an adjustment screw that controls how far down the G# pad cup is pressed down which should be obvious when you pressed the F key - try giving it a 1/4 turn clockwise and see if that helps.
Yes, good advice! If the C is playing allright, but the C#, B and Bb aren't, this could well be the problem.
 

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a leak light is a very good investment. I don't fix my own horns, but I can diagnose the problem and sometimes all it takes is the turn of a screw.
 

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Well I was having the same problem took to my tech and he checked the whole sax no leaks nothing . Its me I have bene playing the tenor for only 5 days coming from alto . I am frustrated and disgusted . Have a meyers 6 MP . Oh well back to practice if you can call it that. I have a Jupiter 889 SG Tenor
 

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I played a Meyer 6 for years until I switched to a Otto Link Tone Edge. The Meyer on tenor can create a very iffy bottom end. If you're serious, get a nice Phil-Tone Tone Edge 6 or 6* Tenor piece. The large chamber should open up the bottom edge.
 

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Tenor mouthpieces where I have experienced poor low end response:

Rousseau JDX 5 metal
RIA 6* metal
Otto Link (metal and hard rubber)
Yanagisawa 7 metal
Phil Barone 1993 metal
ANY mouthpiece w/an uneven table (and there are many!)
Most factory Bergs

Mouthpieces I have played (and/or own) w/great low end response (even throughout actually!):

Spivack refaced Remle .109 metal
Drake refaced Rousseau Classic 5 .090
Drake Custom prototype Jazz Ceramic .108
Drake Studio .110
Custom opened and refaced Hollywood Dukoff
Tenney refaced Berg Larson
Jody Jazz DV 7*
 

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Thank you I wish I would have bought a Phil Tone MP my tech told me they are amazing . Now I am stuck with a Meyers MP for now ugh
 

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Your Meyer can be made better. I have customized some of those to actually be a lot of fun. Flatten the table, address the facing curve and put on a little more baffle and the can be very good pieces. Its a lot cheaper than buying a new mouthpiece.

And thank your tech for me!
 

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If, by chance, it's not a leak, I recommended doing long tones with scotch tape holding down all the keys to low Bb... I've done this for years because of carpal tunnel syndrome and it really helps the low end come to life, and with overtone work, the rest of the horn as well. You can play a low Bb for an hour without any hand strain and the positive results are quite noticeable.
 
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