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Discussion Starter #1
I recently acquired a Buescher Aristocrat Big B Alto and am using a Selmer Super Session E (.078, I think) and it sounds pretty darn good through the entire chromatic and pretty much in tune except for the low D which is a little flat(very little actually).

I'm using Rico 2.5 reeds and have toyed with others (Superial, VD Java, Hemke, et al) as well. My question is this: what are some suggestions for a mouthpiece that would help the horn sound as it did in 1949? I've learned some of those earlier or "vintage" mouthpieces tend to be more closed and as such more "stuffy." Would I need to have such a mouthpiece refaced to be more open if I got one?

I realize this is all personal preference but I also have a Big B Tenor and have an MC Gregory Los Angeles 3A16 refaced to .081, using VD Java 2.5, and it plays beautifully. Sounds good with a plastic Yamaha 4C too!

So while I am happy with what I have, I'm looking for some ideas before going further, if I even do.

Thanks
 

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Congrats on a fine alto.

Yes, it is all personal preference. But on my Big B, I've used a variety of modern mouthpieces, although some have been around for years . . . right now, a Selmer C* I found among my collection, a Don Sinta (obtained from Ed Svoboda, Hurling Frootmig here) which is unmarked but is said to have the same facing as a C* (also it comes from a Zinner blank), and a Meyer 6S-Medium Chamber, to name three. I also have used a Super Session F and a Soloist F. Do I sound like I'm from 1949? Nah, maybe 1929 . . . DAVE
 

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I owned a Buescher alto once and it was very mouthpiece-friendly. A low-cost option, Runyon model 22. It has a nice, vintage sound and it's CHEAP. A more expensive option is a vintage Tonemaster Link (rich, bold and smoky alto sound). Somewhere between those would be a Steve Broadus (perfected model) mouthpiece.

Good luck in your search!
 

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Keep your eyes open for a Woodwind Co. New York "Steel Ebonite." These are easy playing and tuning round-chamber pieces, with a little more focus and less resistance than the (Ra/Bue)schers. They were very popular in the 40s and 50s and can still be had for a reasonable price. WWCo also did a "Dick Stabile Special" with straight sidewalls, which has given me very good results.

Another one you may like is the white Buescher piece, made by Runyon, which was an option for Aristocrats and 400s in the 40s and 50s. This has straight sidewalls and a slightly edgier tone, somewhat like the Brilhart Tonalins that are so collectible these days. It has the True-Tone logo stamped in gold.

Having a (Ra/Bue)scher ring-shank model around is always a good idea. Even if you don't use it regularly, practicing on one can give you a sense of the basic core to the Buescher sound.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks to all. I'll be checking out each of these mouthpieces.

Any feedback on the Buescher "Tru-Lay 55/812M?" I did an eBay bid on one of these about a month ago but it went higher ($130) than I was prepared to pay at the time.

Thanks again, and I'd welcome any more suggestions. (I love researching things so I'll have some fun with the leads each of you has given me.)
 

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The Tru-Lay is that baseline (Ra/Bue)scher stock piece from the 30s and 40s.
 

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nice thing with these is they work with any mpc you want-same for 400
 

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Keep your eyes open for a Woodwind Co. New York "Steel Ebonite." These are easy playing and tuning round-chamber pieces, with a little more focus and less resistance than the (Ra/Bue)schers. They were very popular in the 40s and 50s and can still be had for a reasonable price. WWCo also did a "Dick Stabile Special" with straight sidewalls, which has given me very good results.

Another one you may like is the white Buescher piece, made by Runyon, which was an option for Aristocrats and 400s in the 40s and 50s. This has straight sidewalls and a slightly edgier tone, somewhat like the Brilhart Tonalins that are so collectible these days. It has the True-Tone logo stamped in gold.

Having a (Ra/Bue)scher ring-shank model around is always a good idea. Even if you don't use it regularly, practicing on one can give you a sense of the basic core to the Buescher sound.
I have a refaced Dick Stabile piece on my web page should you be interested. Phil-tone.com
these are nice players.
 

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I played a vandoren s6 mouthpiece on my buescher big b alto and it played beautifully and as more in tune than any other horn I ever had. Just like my tenor big b which I still play. metal Otto link 7* on that one.
 
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