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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello to all, I inherited a saxophone and I’d like to know more about it and it’s value. It’s a Selmer alto made in France.Mark VI it’s not in the best... thank you in advance
 

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so you have identified your saxophone.

As you know it is a valuable brand and type, the value of your sax depends on its state and playability and the production date.

Some finishes are more valuable than others.

Lacking all of this (and even having those data, personal inspection is the only way to go to assess the value of everything) it is impossible to assess its value at present.

A very approximated value could be given only if you would publish pictures (go advanced and click on the icon looking like a projection screen) but even then we won’t know how it plays.

Value is also depending from many local factors and what’s valued X somewhere may be valued Y somewhere else. Just an example, a Selmer Mark VI may be valued a lot more in Japan that it is in France but the Japanese market requires near perfect saxophones and if yours doesn’t conform then it may never sell even for less there compared to other places.

Another thing, you are a new member and you need 6 months of membership and 50 meaningful posts before you may have the privilege to sell here.
 

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Hello to all, I inherited a saxophone and I’d like to know more about it and it’s value. It’s a Selmer alto made in France.Mark VI it’s not in the best... thank you in advance
Welcome to SOTW. Someone left you a nice gift regardless of its monetary value. Don’t be so quick to judge it’s looks. That’s a nice instrument if properly cared for and in tune. Look down to the right where it says go advanced. Click on that. And in the next menu scroll down to where you see manage attachments. Click on that. In the upper right of that menu you will see add. Click on that and select the picture that you want from whatever folder. You can select up to five at a time. They will appear on the bottom left. Click done on the bottom far right. Write at least one word and submit to reply. That’s how you post pictures that we can help you with your questions. There are many variables and pictures help immensely. Along with your general geographical location.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for taking time to answer my questions, I’ll post more pictures of needed. Can I have it cleaned with flitz or brasso???
 

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No, DON'T use metal cleaner, it can take the lacquer off. If you want to have it cleaned take it to a tech who can offer a chemical bath. At that time it will be disassembled, lubed, etc. If it needs any pads replaced, that can be done too to make sure it's in playing condition.
 

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No, no cleaning needed and anything that you would do would diminish its value! Unless you want to play it yourself it will only be detrimental to the sale to have any work done.

It is a very valuable 5 digits Selmer Mark VI and it looks very nice. If it plays well and needs no work it would be worth quite a sum of money.

Alto’s are considerably less worth than Tenors but this could be worth as much as €5000 ina private sale and more if it were sold by a shop. I have sold 2 late ones for €3300 some time ago but I think that the market has appreciated somewhat
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I’ve taken a few more pictures, so does the value drop if it’s chemically clean and put back into playing condition?
 

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looks like you have a few mouthpieces as well. you should include pics (without ligature and cap) of these showing manf / model info as these can significantly impact the overall value.
 

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It is a very valuable 5 digits Selmer Mark VI and it looks very nice. If it plays well and needs no work it would be worth quite a sum of money.
Probably five digit tenors are more the bomb than altos. This one's been relacquered as well. So might want to temper expectations. Three grand is around the ballpark.
 

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No, that's not worth anything. Go ahead and ship that to me for proper disposal. Thanks. :joker:
 

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How come I never inherit stuff like this?
For god's sake don't get Brasso anywhere near this. The horn is very clean. Unless it's unplayable, I'm not sure it's worth it to get any work done on it. From the reeds it looks like it may have been a long time since it was played, so this sort of presents as one of those "under the bed" finds that buyers will salivate over. If you don't want to play it yourself and are planning on selling it, I'd probably just leave it alone.

If it's a re-lacquer it's a very good one; the fine line engraving in the first set of pics looks very sharp.

You're in a major metropolitan area, you should have no problem selling it locally for a very good price, likely closer to the higher market value for VI altos because of it's condition, it's apparently not being played for a long time, and it's un-molested nature. Much less wear and tear on the horn = more value.
 

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The person that left it to you must have had a high opinion of you :) That's obviously a musician's horn, meaning the person who owned it played it, evidently quite a lot.

The mouthpiece question is around the brand of the hard rubber (black) mouthpiece that is covered by the brass cap, people want to know what kind it is. The metal one we know is an old Brilhart Level-Aire. These are very desirable on tenor, not so much on alto.

My suggestion to you is this - if you are not going to play it, please make an effort to see it goes to someone who will. That's a very fine musical instrument, and it deserves to be played. It's not in museum condition (although the condition is very good), so its true value is in the playing :) If you are going to sell it, I think somewhere around the $3500 - $4500 mark would be what you can expect.
 

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What a wonderful gift! If you're a car guy, this is the saxophone equivalent to being given a good condition Tri-Power Goat or a 440 Challenger or something.
 

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Whoever left that to you gave you a piece of pride and joy. That is a top of the food chain instrument. Lucky you. If you have any interest at all in playing saxophone do so. Also write down any know history of where it came from and who the owner was. Along with any sheet music or pictures of person using it. Provenance can add value. FYI mouthpieces can be as little as $100 to over $1000. Top shelf instruments usually have top shelf accessories too.
Chemically cleaning and having it tuned will not decrease its value it will increase its value making it currently proper and playable. But only to the extent of the value of the repair. The chemicals are a much gentler than DIY good from home use. A (COA) clean-oil-adjustments service usually costs around $100. Depending on how old the pads are (leather parts) it may need a full repad. The cost of that service runs about $500. A service technician will be able to tell on the spot. Do not leave it with anyone for a review. Be gentle handling/transporting it in that case. Soft cases do not provide the best protection from damage. Best to keep it home and ask a zillion questions before you take it out to have a technician review. Locally here in Los Angeles there is one at a retail store offered at $4625 completely serviced ready to play. Not including a mouthpiece, case/accessories.
 

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I’ve taken a few more pictures, so does the value drop if it’s chemically clean and put back into playing condition?
No, the value will increase by the amount of money spent putting it into playing condition. That could be anywhere from $200 - $800 (more or less) depending on whether or not it needs a full overhaul. That case should be tossed and replaced with a good case that will protect the horn. But you can also leave all that to the buyer if you don't want to hassle it; you'll only recoup the money you spend getting it fixed up, so probably no additional profit there for you, although it may be slightly easier to sell if it's had an overhaul.

I'd take it to a tech and find out exactly what it needs, then even if you don't get the work done, you can let any prospective buyer know its exact condition.
 
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