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Discussion Starter #1
Im a senior now is high school and Im looking for a school where I can major in classical performance but move into graduate jazz studies at another school (if thats even possible). So somewhere with a well known classical player and program but with a well known jazz teacher as well.

So far ive got UNT and University of Arizona on my list, any more would be appreciated!
 

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...If you're a senior now, why are you just starting to look at schools?
 

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If you don't go to a year-round school or are just starting your senior year you are waaaay too late.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sorry for the confusion, Ill be more clear; Im a senior as of 07-08:)
 

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You can get a good education as an undergrad in both at Western Michigan, but you probably wouldn't want to go there for grad school.
 

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It is my humble opinion, that you need to sit down, and re-evaluate your situation, and truely decide which of the two fields of playing you want to consider. At this point, there are too many players out in the field (many of which unemployed) for new entrants to be both unsure of what they want to study and be sucessful at the same time.

At your age, I thought I knew exactly what I wished to pursue, however as I stepped foot into college, it all changed, as it does for everyone, as it will for you.

My best advice would be to go to an undergrad school with a killin program in both classical and jazz, and go from there.

my best recommendation for such a school would be the New England Conservatory.
 

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mike korch said:
It is my humble opinion, that you need to sit down, and re-evaluate your situation, and truely decide which of the two fields of playing you want to consider. At this point, there are too many players out in the field (many of which unemployed) for new entrants to be both unsure of what they want to study and be sucessful at the same time.

At your age, I thought I knew exactly what I wished to pursue, however as I stepped foot into college, it all changed, as it does for everyone, as it will for you.

My best advice would be to go to an undergrad school with a killin program in both classical and jazz, and go from there.

my best recommendation for such a school would be the New England Conservatory.
I don't understand what that means...Anyway, Western Michigan is definitely a great pick. Prof. Kynaston is a great guy, and he's a master of both genres. He studied legit saxophone with Teal and Londeix, and he frequently plays jazz with Randy Brecker, Joe Lovano, etc.

Tennessee Tech is another fantastic choice. I'm a little biased, but Phil Barham is, quite simply, the greatest teacher I've ever met. He has degrees from North Texas and Michigan, so he's a master of both jazz and classical saxophone. Just a fun guy to be around, too.

Peabody Conservatory has great jazz and classical programs, as do Michigan State, Nebraska (Paul Haar's a haus.), North Carolina School of the Arts, Indiana (You've got Otis Murphy teaching legit, and freakin' Dave Baker is director of jazz studies...). There're lots of options out there...
 

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He ment that the Saxophone performance is overcrowded. THeir are too many performance majors going hungry. And you are unsure of what you want to study. So he is saying that you will likely fail. He is saying go to a school that is good in both. For your undergrad. Then after you really know what you want to study. Go to a school that offers that.
 

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I would recommend Michigan State or Indiana. Michigan State has Luloff for classical, and a jazz faculty that reads like a whose who of todays jazz world(Wess Anderson, Diego Rivera, Rodney Whitaker), along with multiple jazz ensembles. Indiana has Otis and Walsh. The only drawback is that they are both incredibly competitive to get into. If you live close it's easy come easy go for auditions, but when you live in Texas you have a lot more to lose if you don't get in.
 

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Beware of programs that have big-name teachers on their staff. Here in LA, Ernie Watts teaches at UCLA, but I hear you cant really get regular lessons with him because he is always away. The previous poster mentioned Wess Anderson at Michigan, but Wess plays in the JALC Orchestra and with Wynton Marsalis' other groups, how often do you think he will really be in Michigan to teach?

As for the Northern Illinois suggestion, there are a lot a bad ***** players coming out of there, good option.

Good luck with what ever you choose!
 

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saxymanzach said:
Beware of programs that have big-name teachers on their staff. Here in LA, Ernie Watts teaches at UCLA, but I hear you cant really get regular lessons with him because he is always away. The previous poster mentioned Wess Anderson at Michigan, but Wess plays in the JALC Orchestra and with Wynton Marsalis' other groups, how often do you think he will really be in Michigan to teach?

As for the Northern Illinois suggestion, there are a lot a bad ***** players coming out of there, good option.

Good luck with what ever you choose!
I thought Wess left JALC. He currently lives in Lansing. Either way, he just had a stroke and may not be teaching or playing for awhile.
 

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Agent27 said:
I thought Wess left JALC. He currently lives in Lansing. Either way, he just had a stroke and may not be teaching or playing for awhile.
Wow, I didn't know either of those things. Man, he's only 44, A STROKE!?! That's terrible, O hope he can get back to playing soon....
 

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check out www.wesswarmdaddyanderson.com and click on "News on Wess" to find out what's going on.

As for finding a school for both, I'd say study jazz, but find a teacher who hits you with classical rep as part of your study. Being the holder of a classical saxophone degree and a working musician, I can tell you that I haven't performed any classical saxophone (especially for money) since I got out of school. I will say that the work I did in school learning to play the horn has made it easier to go between styles and fit into different ensembles. The more you know about your instrument and your abilities, the more you can do with it.
A totally different route might be to study jazz saxophone and take classical lessons on a double. I can think of a number of people who have a bachelor's in saxophone performance and a master's in clarinet performance.
Good luck with your search Devin.
 
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