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Hey folks,
I have a Yamaha 684 flute with an EC (GPLP) headjoint and looking for new sound possibilities. In theory it seems like it woudl be nice to have a wood headjoint but I've not tried one personally nor am I sure of who makes a good one. What are your thoughts for you doublers out there?
 

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Um, well, I was with you until you said doublers. I have a 581 flute that I put a Sankyo headjoint on. It changed the flute. The standard EC headjoint is ok, but the projection, response and tone from the Sankyo headjoint.....no comparison. For a doubler, this is an excellent investment. In fact, I know of a few guys who play or have played on crappy flute bodies with an excellent headjoint and no one was the wiser.

Now, wood....I guess. I don't think I'd ever have any use for it. The only other headjoint I'd look into is Robert Dick's Glissando headjoint. http://www.glissando.biz/ Now that would be pretty darn cool, probably cheaper than a wood one, and the sound possibilities are endless.
 

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I've got the 581 which is now the 584H. It has the EC headjoint.

Great low register. However it always seems like something's missing. Especially in the third register.

I'm going to get it checked out to see if there is a small leak. Not crazy about the scale either.

Maybe if I practiced it that would help.

Maybe I'm buying into the "neutral Yamaha sound".

I want to try a Muramatsu or something.
 

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There are many to try. It's very personal. But I personally suggest you at least try the head offered with the Muramatsu EX.

Wood may be romantic, but does not necessarily make any difference. It is the cut and taper(and to a smaller degree, the surface texture of the bore) that make a huge difference.

Search this forum. Lots has been written already.
 

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Um, well, I was with you until you said doublers. I have a 581 flute that I put a Sankyo headjoint on. It changed the flute. The standard EC headjoint is ok, but the projection, response and tone from the Sankyo headjoint.....no comparison. For a doubler, this is an excellent investment. In fact, I know of a few guys who play or have played on crappy flute bodies with an excellent headjoint and no one was the wiser.

Now, wood....I guess. I don't think I'd ever have any use for it. The only other headjoint I'd look into is Robert Dick's Glissando headjoint. http://www.glissando.biz/ Now that would be pretty darn cool, probably cheaper than a wood one, and the sound possibilities are endless.
Dick's headjoint is a one-trick pony. You don't want to use it for most stuff unless you need the slide-whistle effect.

Saying a "wood headjoint" is like saying a "red car", neither the material in the former case nor the color in the latter are major determinants of the performance. In the case of the headjoint most everything comes down to the geometry of the embouchure hole and chimney and that of the tube.
 

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This post corrects post number 3. Should be 684 H.

I've got the 581 which is now the 684 H. It has the EC headjoint.

Great low register. However it always seems like something's missing. Especially in the third register.

I'm going to get it checked out to see if there is a small leak. Not crazy about the scale either.

Maybe if I practiced it that would help.

Maybe I'm buying into the "neutral Yamaha sound".

I want to try a Muramatsu or something.
 

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I also agree with Bruce - "I think the EC is a fine head and would stick with it. "
And dzve - "I would give a powell signature a go..... "

All three are excellent.

equaque, dare I say it, one has to wonder if there are other factors other than the head that make your playing disappointing. For me, one clue is that you are disappointed with high notes. Have you had flute lessons from a flute player?
Another clue is your lack of practice. There is no short cut to good control of pitch, tone, and volume for the high notes of a flute.

(BTW, leaks affect low notes far more than high notes.)
 

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i love my muramatsu headjoint that came with my EX however ive found in the past a powell headjoint to be louder (may be the acoustics of the room) and brighter sounding. You may have a problem fitting the headjoint- im not sure. My yamaha is too narrow to take the muramatsu headjoint, but my yamaha is only a 211sii. The muramatsu headjoint has a larger hole to play into compared to my yamaha and im not sure whether or not all yamaha headjoints have a small hole.
 

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I also agree with Bruce - "I think the EC is a fine head and would stick with it. "
And dzve - "I would give a powell signature a go..... "

All three are excellent.

equaque, dare I say it, one has to wonder if there are other factors other than the head that make your playing disappointing. For me, one clue is that you are disappointed with high notes. Have you had flute lessons from a flute player?
Another clue is your lack of practice. There is no short cut to good control of pitch, tone, and volume for the high notes of a flute.

(BTW, leaks affect low notes far more than high notes.)
Hi Gordon. What I meant is I'm coming from an Armstrong model 80 which had perfect intonation and excellent power in the third register and I could go up to F in the fourth register when I was in practice.

Really one of the main reasons I "upgraded" was for the low B and the fact that I bought into the hype about pointed arms , white gold springs and the gizmo key (which I never need ) etc. I gave the Armstrong away.

When I got the 581 I believed it was one of the best flutes I had ever played And I've played some nice Haynes.

It has the best low register but I'm wondering if it's at the expense of the high register that seems a little thin.

I play the correct fingerings for the third register so I'm not a doubler in that sense. I'm a flautist.

What I know and you know is I just have to practice the flute which I have not been doing at all.

I got the flute 4 years ago and have not given it the attention it deserves.

I've been so absorbed with the tenor sax.

The truth is I don't really know this particular flute. I've never consistently practiced it since I got it.
 

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Altus makes some good headjoints. I have one of Britania metal made the old way with a seam. It makes switching between sax and flute easier.
 

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"It makes switching between sax and flute easier."
Why? !!!

The so-called effect of the seam is just a lot of marketing hype, and so is the Britannia metal.

Acoustic scientists know a lot about the acoustic design of flutes. IT is the vibrating air column that produces the sound. Any sound produced by the minute vibrations of the metal are not discernible for the human ear. Reasonably rigorous "double-blind" tests have confirmed this.

There is endless discussion of this, with links to the research and testing, elsewhere in this forum .

Flute players are readily taken for a ride! It is the minute dimensional detail that makes one flute different from another, not the metal and tube construction.

But yes, Altus makes some good head joints.
 

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I would go for a muramatsu if you want something that you can dial in quickly but overs some resistance and darkness.
The Powell and Altus may be too big, bright and fast responsding.
As someone who has played in professional theatre and all sorts of doubling situations/combinations I can say that you don't want to feel like a Valiant driver who suddenly gets into a Subaru WRX ***. A little bit of resistance to 'lean' into is nice.
That said, the ec is a good headjoint as are the others.
 

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A headjoint is a very personal thing. What one player loves is anathema to another. That depends not only on prior experience and expectation and blowing style, but on physiology--some embouchures are a better match for some headjoints than others. It is good to hear other folks' recommendations, but you really gotta try each candidate and decide for yourself--and don't forget either that there is significant variation between exemplars of the same model.
 
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