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Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
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Also, I believe the common consensus from folks here is that material of Mouthpieces makes no difference. But that should probably be in its own relevant thread (or any of the 1000s of previous ones)
When it comes to hard rubber versus plastic nobody in the world can tell me they feel the same to my top teeth and palate and head while I play, even if they think they sound identical - which I don’t. <smile>
I think the consensus is that material per se doesn't make an acoustic difference (i.e., one that is audible, in itself, to a listener).

There are many different plastics (of which hard rubber is one type) and they can feel quite a bit different to the player. For me, lighter plastics feel very unpleasantly "buzzy", but plastics that have roughly the same density and hardness as hard rubber feel virtually indistinguishable.
 

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Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
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Just between you and me <wink> I wonder how many folks in the consensus that all materials sound the same happen to own $500 - $1000 USD hard rubber mouthpieces and drool over vintage Slant Signature Links and NY Meyer Bros pieces, right?
It's not clear that these preferences have anything to do with materials, though. You can pick up hard rubber mouthpieces for under $100, and I own several "plastic" mouthpieces that each cost $300-$400 new.

In any event, the fact that people pay extra for fancy materials is nothing new. Flutists, for example, regularly pay premiums of $10k or more to get flutes made of gold alloys or other precious metals. Suggestion is a powerful thing.
 

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I think the consensus is that material per se doesn't make an acoustic difference (i.e., one that is audible, in itself, to a listener).

There are many different plastics (of which hard rubber is one type) and they can feel quite a bit different to the player. For me, lighter plastics feel very unpleasantly "buzzy", but plastics that have roughly the same density and hardness as hard rubber feel virtually indistinguishable.
This isn’t a materials thread though, right?
I responded with my recommendations on which mouthpieces under $200 I thought would pair well with a decent new Alto. That’s it. I do fatigue of having to defend everything I say on this forum when many discussions are seeking opinions based on personal (perhaps subjective / unsubstantiated) experience or preferences.
 

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It's not clear that these preferences have anything to do with materials, though. You can pick up hard rubber mouthpieces for under $100, and I own several "plastic" mouthpieces that each cost $300-$400 new.

In any event, the fact that people pay extra for fancy materials is nothing new. Flutists, for example, regularly pay premiums of $10k or more to get flutes made of gold alloys or other precious metals. Suggestion is a powerful thing.
Also “suggestion is a powerful thing” sure but we’re discussing preferences. I feel sometimes as if I’m being told that “scientifically speaking there’s no difference between eating pizza and cardboard” or; to be a little less silly “one flavour of ice cream has been proven to taste better than another”. Like - dude - if I like hard rubber or metal or wood or plastic or whatever it’s what I like I don’t have to prove why it’s valid.
 

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Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
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This isn’t a materials thread though, right?
I responded with my recommendations on which mouthpieces under $200 I thought would pair well with a decent new Alto. That’s it. I do fatigue of having to defend everything I say on this forum when many discussions are seeking opinions based on personal (perhaps subjective / unsubstantiated) experience or preferences.
Fair enough.

Just note that many other people (including me) also made mouthpiece suggestions based on "personal experience or preferences". Some of these suggestions were for mouthpieces that happened to be made of hard rubber, others were suggestions for mouthpieces that are made of other plastics. However, you were the first respondent (in repsponses #14 and #16) to specifically mention materials as a distinguishing factor. Without that, it's likely that no one would have mentioned materials.
 

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Fair enough.

Just note that many other people (including me) also made mouthpiece suggestions based on "personal experience or preferences". Some of these suggestions were for mouthpieces that happened to be made of hard rubber, others were suggestions for mouthpieces that are made of other plastics. However, you were the first respondent (in repsponses #14 and #16) to specifically mention materials as a distinguishing factor. Without that, it's likely that no one would have mentioned materials.
Not fair. The first mention of the material was purely factual and informational - the Yamaha customs are made out of premium ebonite. The clear distinct difference I mentioned is that one is hard rubber and the other plastic. The only reason I mentioned difference in materials again later is because Pete called me out and asked me to justify my recommendation for the custom line versus standard Yamaha pieces. I hope I am making good sense. None of this serves the original poster, I see threads get hijacked into ancillary debates and arguments time and again like this. It’s not fun for me - but more importantly - again - it doesn’t relate to what the OP is asking for. It’s a sideline quasi-argument about something not asked about.
 

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If the sax is aimed at the intro market, then a stock Yamaha would be ideal (say the 4C). If more advanced, then I think a Windy City Woodwinds offering (typically at $80-90) makes a lot of sense, and you could customise the mpc to make it unique to your brand (their '56 is fabulous at $90 for hand-faced loveliness though it might not be a great general purpose piece)

My $0.02
 

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I want to offer a stock mouthpiece with a new line of altos that is actually good. I want a stock mouthpiece that retails or has an MAP of $200 or lower that I can pair with the altos. It doesn't have to be classical or jazz specific, it just has to play well: even scale both intonation and timbre, quick response, strong high notes and easy low notes.
You've left out the most important part: will these horns be aimed at beginners or at more advanced players? If the latter, then I'd say either don't include a mouthpiece at all, and pass the savings on to the buyer, or offer the buyer a choice of 2-3 different mouthpieces.

For a student alto, the Yanagisawa HR ( the original, not the new Yany classical mp, which although excellent, is more specialized), certainly would satisfy all your criteria.
 

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This looks great, except that the explanation for choosing PLA over ABS seems rather tenuous.

For HR, I cannot imagine anything better than a Vandoren A35 as an all-round mouthpiece for an alto sax.

Best of luck Palo!
 

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Tenor: Eastman 52nd St, Alto: P. Mauriat 67RDK, Soprano: Eastern Music Curvy
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Totally spaced it, but our member meven is making a full range of Mouthpieces under the $200 range! He does great work, would be an impressive addition to any horn!

 

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I've never played a Vandoren piece that didn't respond well, and the line they offer covers all bases. In my opinion, no one provides more reliable bang for your buck.
 

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Apart from the price, what is that difference? To me the basic 4C is any bit as good as the more expensive "custom"

And thinking of that, I would also recommend for palo the 4c (ie the basic one) as very viable.
I purchased a 6CM for tenor after seeing that the custom versions were hand faced while the facing for the plastic pieces came from the mold. Not having a plastic 6C to compare I have no basis of comparison other than to note that the custom is very reed friendly. YMMV applies here.
 

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I like the Yanagisawa hard rubber pieces a lot more than the Yamaha pieces, however I’m not sure what they retail for.
They are pretty good pieces made from high quality hard rubber. I think they are over priced though as they run about $160 - $200 new. It’s cheaper to find someone willing to resell the mouthpiece stocked with their Yany horn on eBay or Reverb.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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I wonder how many folks in the consensus that all materials sound the same happen to own $500 - $1000 USD hard rubber mouthpieces
I didn't there actually wasa consensus. My own oponion is that material per se makes no diffence, what makes the difference is the density of the material.

So some resin may sound different to HR, but other resin will not. This is why we use a denser resin which can include metal or stone in the composite. I am using the word resin because plastic covers both HR and resin composties so can be confusing.

What complicates matters is that differences can be perceptable or not depending on the moutpice design. This is because any differences caused by resonance only happen when the material is thin. hence a high beaffle mouthpiece is like to msound the same whatved density of material. Low baffle with thinner material wall can sound difference due to vibration ear the tip. (The pseudo double reed resonance effect)

but plastics that have roughly the same density and hardness as hard rubber feel virtually indistinguishable.
Exactly. They sould feel indistinguishabel re: sound/responce, though people senistive to material surface may notice something. I wouldn't
The only reason I mentioned difference in materials again later is because Pete called me out and asked me to justify my recommendation for the custom line versus standard Yamaha pieces. I hope I am making good sense.
I don't think I "called you out," just asked the question because maybe you had more experience of comparing the two than I did.
 

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Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
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You've left out the most important part: will these horns be aimed at beginners or at more advanced players? If the latter, then I'd say either don't include a mouthpiece at all,
I agree to a point. Advanced players will use their own mouthpiece. But these days beginners often buy advanced horns. For that reason, I would always include a mouthpiece that is good for beginners, but choose a price point way less than the $200 posited here.
 
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