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Hello! I tried looking for this in the search, but didn't come across anything.

It seems to be a pretty common technique, but I have no idea how it works. I'm talking about that really long bend upwards (more often than down). How does that work?

Joshua Redman does it here at about 0:50, although I have heard him do it for longer but I can't remember where: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Mqtc3bI6k0&feature=related

Also, Bob Reynolds does it here around 7:50 for about 5 seconds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kr83BKg7nWo

Is it a combination of throat and fingerings?

Thanks!
 

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I bet you have to set your embouchure up like you are playing a low Bb. Drop your jaw all the way down and finger the note a few scale degree above the note you want to sound. So you can bend the note up as you are blowing and bringing your lower jaw back up. I don't know, thats just a guess, but I'd be interested in how this is done too
 

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I bet you have to set your embouchure up like you are playing a low Bb. Drop your jaw all the way down and finger the note a few scale degree above the note you want to sound. So you can bend the note up as you are blowing and bringing your lower jaw back up. I don't know, thats just a guess, but I'd be interested in how this is done too
I don't agree with the above statement, IMHO you need to practise using your vocal tract to bend notes (not vibrato) on the saxophone. The glissando F trick will illistrate this. Play top F using the front fingering, using your vocal track only try bending the note downwards (keep you embouchure as relaxed as possible), thinking of the vowels Hay, Hoo or Haw may help. You may only be able to lower the F a semitone or tone at first but with practise you will manage an octave if you are doing it correctly. If you try doing this exercise by lowering the jaw only (as in vibrato) you will manage a third if you are lucky and the sound will be much inferior

Hope this helps you keep on the correct track!

Malcolm
 

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I put a very short tutorial on youtube a couple years ago describing how I do what I call "octave slides". As I mentioned in the description of the video, it wasn't intended for advanced players who may have different approaches to achieving the same effect. It was merely in response to someone else who had asked a similar question. The audio examples on the video are relatively fast slides, but once you've mastered the technique it can be drawn out into a long, slow, and very smooth slide of an octave or more.

As an edit to what I wrote on the video...it probably does require more than just lip control. It's something I had learned how to do on my own 30+ years ago, and I had never really thought about how to describe the way I did it before I made that video. As Malcolm indicated, I'm sure I'm probably using my throat and tongue in addition to my lip in order to get a smooth slide. The most important part to me though is the way I described how to "break the tone lock" in order to get it started. I made up that term because I didn't know of a better way to describe it.

Don't laugh. It is what it is...just a gimmick.

 
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