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Hi!

A few months ago, I bought a Yamaha YTS-280 and noticed there is a little brass tube sticking inside the neck of the saxophone. It seems to be part of the octave hole (the one that opens when you play notes lower than A with the octave key pressed... sorry... I lack the technical term for these).
I use to play the alto (a Conn) and there was no such tube inside the neck of the sax. I don't think it affects the sound (or at least not at my level of playing) but I am curious to know if this is normal or a manufacturing error.

Here are some pics for better illustration:

IMG_3544.jpg
(view form the top of the saxophone with bell removed)

Thanks in advance for your insight!

LD
 

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This is the body octave "pip" or vent tube. It's similar to the one that protrudes into the bore of your neck under your neck octave key pad. Normally they're quite a bit shorter than this one on your horn, but all saxophones do have them.
 

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Theres actually a fair bit of physics that describes the ideal diameter and intrusion of the pip. That one looks a little deeper than most that Ive seen?
If it plays OK and doesn't snag your pull through I wouldn't lose sleep over it. If the octave response seems slow or there is some iffy intonation it may be a contributing factor...

*Science content warning*
https://ccrma.stanford.edu/marl/Benade/documents/Benade-ConeHole-1973.pdf
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2016
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Forestman, let's get terminology straight, just for future reference: it is the body tube of the horn which you are talking about, and you photographed looking down the neck receiver...not the 'neck' as you wrote (which also has an octave pip, of course).

Also, I hope you didn't really remove the bell of the sax before you took the photo :bluewink:

This is typical of Yamahas, at least the second-shelf/student models. It is actually a bit frustrating for a repair person, because that quite long pip tube makes it hard to get dent rods down the horn, even some rods which are slotted to bypass the pip. Usually when I am working on a Yama, inevitably I have to usnolder and remove the pip and trim it down, then resolder.

(And, I might add, in no way is intonation or response altered in any discernible manner by the trimming....)

But as noted by others, for all practical purposes there is nothing to concern you here. It's the typical Yama detail, for whatever reason.
 
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