Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sorry if this has already been done and I've missed it, but as there doesn't seem to be masses of info around on Holton saxes compared to the other brands wouldn't it be useful to have a list of the Holton models and what quality/standard.

From browsing this forum I've managed to glean that my model #666 and the #566 altos are student standard while the #232 is the higher quality pro model but have no idea where the Rudy Weidoeft model or the other altos fit into the scale.

Same goes for the tenors I guess the collegiate tenor is a student model and the 241 is a pro horn but where are the others in that line up.

I just seems to me that this would be a useful reference tool for guys new to the Holton scene and considering purchasing a Holton horn.

What do you guys think?
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member and Champion of the Holt
Joined
·
1,477 Posts
That's why I'd like a pro to review....I know what I like personally, but I'd sure like pro comparisons on build quality, key layout, adjustability (is that a word?), design features, ease of play, playing characteristics, etc., and comparisons to other period saxophones. Comparing these models could be similar to Buescher comparisons of True Tone to Aristocrats, of Martin early Handcrafts to Committee IIIs.

All I have now are period/time-frame thoughts: "Elkhorns" (they are really "Revelation" models), and Rudy Wiedoefts are 1920s and 30s to late 30s models respectfully, presumably with whatever limitations other period saxes had then. Tenors 241, 243 and 244 (aka Stratodyne), as well as alto 232 (rh bell keys), 233 (lh bell keys), and 234 (Stratodyne altos, rh bell keys again), and 271 baris are later---1940s into 1950s models, with possibly the same improvements other brands experienced over the same timeframe. Unfortunately, I don't know...no pro reviews I've ever seen concerning. JayePDX is probably the only guy on this site to have all these models available to compare. Additionally, there were other models sprinkled throughout: 214 and 204 tenors and altos...late 30s, but higher build quality supposedly (member Jazzbug1 owns a tenor 214), as well as 400 series horns which are pretty much a mystery to me. Lastly, Soprano builds (or at least design advancement) are similar to other brands----they petered out in the late 30s.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,844 Posts
I think that is a pretty accurate list of model numbers. I have a 241 tenor and a 232 alto and Revelation bari. The alto is not playable but appears to be well made. It is in nearly mint condition so its a future project. I think the pro Holton models are excellent sounding.I am doing some work on an older split bell alto. I am not really impressed with the tone of it at the moment, but its not completely finished. Where as I think the Buescher and Martin split bells are really nice.

I enjoy my 241 tenor. The tone is really nice. In fact I have this horn sitting on a stand for its quick use. I think it has a Conn 10m type vibe, but the ergos are superior. Its mechanism seem a bit clunky to some other horns. However could use some more set up and I have been too busy to bother. I find altissimo to be a little more effort on the 241. I have seen some really minty 241 go cheap if you really watch for them. I would not hesitate to buy a pro model Holton. I have a bunch of pro tenors. Tone wise the 241 can hang with the best.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member and Champion of the Holt
Joined
·
1,477 Posts
- BTW....I was looking through old threads...214 Tenor/204 altos were called "Resotones". These seem to have been produced alongside more conventional models such as 201 altos, 213 tenors, and 215 baris. Those all pretty much seem to be evolutionary advances on older Revelation models. Evolutionary as with other manufacturers....moving from 30s leaning towards later 40s designs.

- 400 series (465 alto, and 475(?) tenor were "Ideal" models.

I personally have a Revelation Tenor, Revelation Soprano, Rudy Alto, two 232 Altos, and a 241 Tenor.

I recommend looking through the "Modern Vintage" Holton Thread....lots of info and some comparative pictures.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
yeah that's a long thread so will set aside an evening to work through it.


So just going on what I've seen so far we have

Soprano

Alto

234 (Top of the Line Stratodyne)
233 Pro Horns
232

Rudy
Revelation Intermediate

666 (Collegiates)
566 Student


Tenor

244 (Top Of The Line)
243 Pro Horns
241




Bari

Bass

Will update as I go through the threads
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member and Champion of the Holt
Joined
·
1,477 Posts
Soprano

Rudy
Revelation Intermediate
Rudys and Revelations weren't intermediate. They were Holton's top line horns when produced. They are just older than the others. It is like comparing an early Buescher True Tone to a later Aristocrat or TH&C. The old True Tones were top line too in Buescher's case when they were made....they were just more primitive than later horns.

Also, for sopranos: there are Revelations and Rudys. Additionally, there are Couturier made examples--there is a Couturier-made Collegiate somewhere in the Holton pages. I don't know of any others. Also, I've never seen a Holton Sop with a model number stamped on it, regardless what the catalogs specify as model designations. Anyone?

For Bass: Most Holton Bass Saxophones seem to be Conn Stencils. I've only seen ONE example of a Holton-made Bass--probably a prototype. It has a page in the Holton section.

--There was also an example of a Holton Sopranino. It has a page too. Again, probably a prototype.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top