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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey gang, thanks for your time. I've been having a problem w my new theo wanne ligature (and I seem to remember having this same problem years ago when I was experimenting w the Francois Louis lig). I find that any mouthpiece position adjustment once it's on the sax neck to be impossible to perform without dislodging the lig. I played years and years w the classic old school two screw lig and never had this problem. Even if I wrap my hand around the whole piece and try to keep everything stable I still find that the ligature will dislodge and move move around if i try to adjust mouthpiece. What's the secret to avoiding this??

Thanks a million.
 

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I've had this problem, too, but only with mouthpieces that fit tightly on the neck. If it's not a super tight fit, I usually find that I can make adjustments by grasping the mouthpiece on either side of the TW lig. It's only when I have to push harder that things get dicey.

If you're pretty well settled on a particular mouthpiece, you could probably adjust the cork so that it doesn't take to much pressure to make an adjustment (but is still tight enough to stay in place while you're playing!). But if, like me, you do use different mouthpieces in different situations, and they do have significantly different bore sizes, you might just have to switch ligs.
 

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I agree with all the solutions offered, so far. I've had this problem, too and I prefer the old metal two-screw/two-band ligs like Selmer issued (in fact, I like the Selmer-brand ligs the best of that style).

My problem is that often, even the Selmer ligs are not tight enough. So, I either have the cork replaced so the mouthpiece fits but not too tight, or I deal with the slipping ligs and put up with the re-adjustment after moving the piece on the cork. DAVE
 

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How is this a forum problem???
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How about this potential solution...putting a patch on the top of the piece to allow the lig to dig in a bit and get a better grip? Any reason why this is not advisable?
 

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How ‘bout getting a less tight fit to the cork, and gripping the mouthpiece by the shank to move it?

That’s what I do with my Francois Louis ligs.
 

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Just go back to using a 2 screw lig that fits properly, simple as that
I have a Metal Mosaic from Phil-Tone with a TW ligature and it is very slippery. I dont like it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I just tried my own suggestion of applying patches to top and sides of piece...worked like a charm! I think they were vandoren .4mm clear. My beak patch is .3mm BG (no longer made?).
 

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I just tried my own suggestion of applying patches to top and sides of piece...worked like a charm! I think they were vandoren .4mm clear. My beak patch is .3mm BG (no longer made?).
I have had good luck using a small strip of painters tape over the back of the mouthpiece. The nice thing about this tape is that it is not super sticky, so it doesn't leave much residue, and it is not likely to damage any printing that might be on the top of the mouthpiece.
 

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I've tried all the fancy ligs including Theo Wanne, Vandoren Optimum, Francois Louis and I played Winslow ligs for 20 years and they all slipped around. I've been in the Selmer two screw camp for the past 10 years. They stay in place and do what a lig is supposed to do.
 

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Haha...I say this ad nauseum: the 2-screw metal ligature is BY FAR the best for me. Reeds vibrate more freely and you can tune your saxophone in mid-performance without any slippage. The Rover Light (Lite?) is ok if you want something a bit fancier but it still dampens the reed. My money can be better spent on stuff other than fancy ligs.
Now that $80something custom-made reed case...well, I'd like to have me one of those.:mrgreen:
 

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Normally I'm all for threads that expand, with lots of ideas, and even going off track to some extent. But I gotta say, the answer was given in the first response (post#2 by Pete Thomas) and the thread could end right there. And yes, I realize the irony of the fact that I'm posting another response.
 

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That totally discounts the valuable input from MLucky, Dr G, and Mijderf.
Not really. Even if you use a two-screw ligature, you need to realize that it is a ligature, not a clamp or a vise. Your cork needs to be properly sized for your mouthpiece, so you may tune easily while maintaining correct position on the cork - not too tight, not too loose. Two-screw ligs work, and they make things a lot more straightforward for a lot o’ folk.
 

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I know it's fashionable to hate the Rovner ligatures but they don't slip. And they come in a wide range of sizes.

Personally that's what I use on all my MPs and have been a satisfied user since 1978.
 

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I know it's fashionable to hate the Rovner ligatures but they don't slip. And they come in a wide range of sizes.

Personally that's what I use on all my MPs and have been a satisfied user since 1978.
+1

I have a Rovner light for hard rubber and a Rovner dark for metal pieces. They were cheap and I've never had any problems with them. I don't actually believe that ligatures make much of a sonic difference anyway, so it's all about ease of use and reliability for me and the Rovners have worked great.
 
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