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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2009
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Hi all,

I'm diving into tango to expand my musical expression a bit. I found the scheme of Libertango (Piazzolla), but I'm a bit confused :

Am B/A Bdim/A Am
C/G B/F# Bdim/F E/F

I understand that X/Y means you play chord X but with Y as the lowest note (inversions). But I couldn't puzzle Bdim/A : I thought Bdim was B D F, and the extention would then be Ab. But apparently, it isn't. What did I miss?
 

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Pedal point

Jolle said:
Hi all,

I'm diving into tango to expand my musical expression a bit. I found the scheme of Libertango (Piazzolla), but I'm a bit confused :

Am B/A Bdim/A Am
C/G B/F# Bdim/F E/F

I understand that X/Y means you play chord X but with Y as the lowest note (inversions). But I couldn't puzzle Bdim/A : I thought Bdim was B D F, and the extention would then be Ab. But apparently, it isn't. What did I miss?
Jolle,
if you study the first row, you will notice that in case of all chords there is "A" as bass note (or lowest note). It is called pedal point. The dissonance created will resolve back in the last chord (Am).

Wikipedia said:
In tonal music, a pedal point (also pedal tone, pedal note, organ point, or pedal) is a sustained tone, typically in the bass, during which at least one foreign, i.e., dissonant harmony is sounded in the other parts. A pedal point is a "non-chord tone", which puts it in the same musical categories as suspensions, retardations, and passing tones. However, the pedal point is unique among non-chord tones "in that begins on a consonance, sustains (or repeats) through another chord as a dissonance until the harmony" not the non-chord tone, "resolves back to a consonance." [1]
 
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