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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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The blues can't swing? Excuse me?

Seriously? Of course the blues can swing and this is an example of a jump swing which is a pretty traditional blues style, but you don't really think this kind of swing is what the guy was getting at do you?
 

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You want Blues ?

Here's Blues - Cajun Blues from Rockin' Dopsie, with the great JOHN HART on tenor:

 

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SOTW Columnist, Distinguished SOTW Member
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..... for one thing the blues rhythm is a driving rhythm as opposed to a swinging rhythm...
The blues is not a swinging rhythm?????!!! It doesn't have to be, but there are thousands of solid blues tunes that swing like mad. That's one of the hallmarks of the blues. A whole genre of blues called the 'jump blues' is based on the swing rhythm.

Tell me if this swings or not (I could give 1000 examples):


or this:


And sure, the blues has often been played with a funk rhythm, driving shuffle (which does swing in its own way), and obviously a slow blues is more of a ballad. The blues is extremely flexible which is one of its many positive traits.
 

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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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And sure, the blues has often been played with a funk rhythm, driving shuffle (which does swing in its own way), and obviously a slow blues is more of a ballad. The blues is extremely flexible which is one of its many positive traits.
Yup, and why it's so accessible and enjoyed way more than straight ahead jazz out in the real world.
 

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If you gotta ask what the blues is - the answer won't help you at all.
+1. Very true. But I'm not sure anyone is asking what the blues is on this thread; I just sense a certain amount of resistance to how widespread and varied the blues can be. Some seem to want to limit it only to the 'Chicago Blues' or 'rock blues' when it's so much more than that.
 

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+1. Very true. But I'm not sure anyone is asking what the blues is on this thread; I just sense a certain amount of resistance to how widespread and varied the blues can be. Some seem to want to limit it only to the 'Chicago Blues' or 'rock blues' when it's so much more than that.
Again, the blues scene is prominent in all corners of the world and is often a lot more fun than the respective jazz scene.
 

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Again, the blues scene is prominent in all corners of the world and is often a lot more fun than the respective jazz scene.
No argument there. I agree with that. Much as I love jazz, the 'jazz scene' is not what it used to be and I'm more into playing the blues, but only if you include the wide range of blues styles, including jump blues, swing, "Chicago/Texas/Oakland/New Orleans" (etc) blues, funk, old school R&B, minor blues, various alterations on the form (8-bar, 16-bar, blues with a bridge, etc), slow blues, fast blues, and yes, 'jazz' blues. That's the point I guess I'm trying to make. The title of the thread doesn't specify only one basic type of blues.

Finally, just an aside, but there would be no jazz without the blues and every great jazz player was a master of the blues. It might be true that the further jazz strays from it's roots in the blues, the more it loses an audience. But that's another topic.
 

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Tenor, alto, Bb Clarinet, Flute
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+1. Don't forget Albert King, BB King, Albert Collins, Bobby Blue Bland, Dr John, Fats Domino, Muddy Waters, T-Bone Walker, and the list goes on... I grew up listening to all those guys, most of them in live performances. And a lot of them had horns in their bands.
Agreed. Those are the guys that the ones I mentioned learned from. The top 40 AM radio stations were playing the ones I listed. I 'discovered' the ones on your list listening to college stations, KDVS, the UC Davis station and the Sac State station.
 

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Finally, just an aside, but there would be no jazz without the blues and every great jazz player was a master of the blues.
Right, like these two masters: :)

- Arnett Cobb:

- Illinois Jacquet:
 

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Discussion Starter · #53 ·
I don't care what anyone says, I still hate long tones and I still love the blues. Dig it. Thats my OPINION> :director::protest:

Right, like these two masters: :)

- Arnett Cobb:

- Illinois Jacquet:
 

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Forum Contributor 2015-17
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Seriously? Of course the blues can swing and this is an example of a jump swing which is a pretty traditional blues style, but you don't really think this kind of swing is what the guy was getting at do you?
Yes, seriously. What was he getting at, tell me? The videos he posted were fabulous.

I think the Little Walter video is a good, unqualified, blues that swings, but what interests me about the best harp players is how they created effective solos despite having a limited melodic vocabulary. The lines blur for me, but I guess for someone to get booked into a blues club as a blues band they are going to need to project some rhythm that makes people want to get loaded and move around on a dance floor, right?
 

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OK, the blues can be funky as well, hence the "Funky Blues". Note, three different alto players, each with their own approach and style. One of them didn't practice long tones, he invented them.

 

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Selmer Balanced Action Tenor Saxophone, Powell Flute
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I don't care what anyone says, I still hate long tones and I still love the blues. Dig it. Thats my OPINION> :director::protest:
I support and respect your opinion to hate long tones. I hate asparagus, but I won't say it's not good for you:).

Sent from my SM-N950U using Tapatalk
 

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Just a guy who plays saxophone.
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No argument there. I agree with that. Much as I love jazz, the 'jazz scene' is not what it used to be and I'm more into playing the blues, but only if you include the wide range of blues styles, including jump blues, swing, "Chicago/Texas/Oakland/New Orleans" (etc) blues, funk, old school R&B, minor blues, various alterations on the form (8-bar, 16-bar, blues with a bridge, etc), slow blues, fast blues, and yes, 'jazz' blues. That's the point I guess I'm trying to make. The title of the thread doesn't specify only one basic type of blues.

Finally, just an aside, but there would be no jazz without the blues and every great jazz player was a master of the blues. It might be true that the further jazz strays from it's roots in the blues, the more it loses an audience. But that's another topic.
The title doesn't specify but the original post makes it very clear. I think only 2-3 people who've commented here read and understood the first post. Bunch of irrelevant chatter.
 

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2014
Super Action 80 Tenor, Buescher 156 Tenor, Yamaha Vito YAS-21 , Kessler Soprano, Superba II Bari
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Totally agree that the blues are essential. If you can be creative while stuck in the I, IV, V progression, your ability to hear and understand the meaning of changes expands tenfold. There are also many different blues gigs. Purest styles require that you stick with the classic licks and phrasing. Modern rock based blues do allow you to use jazz substitutions, and I'd argue that many Bebop licks fit in most styles. I personally love the old Delta blues with resonator acoustic guitars and slides. I don't know of many serious jazzers who will knock the style, but there are a lot of hot shot highschoolers - early 20 year olds who think that they're too good for the style. Once the experienced players tell them that they're "playing like ______", they rethink their position on the matter and usually come around.
 
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