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so i have an idea of what i want to do for my jr recital(which is still a little under a year)

but i want to see what the old and wise have to say about choosing pieces?


should i go with mostly standards?

or

maybe one standard and some pieces that aren't played as much??

30 min of music is really the only guideline on paper.




so any thoughts would be great
 

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If you decide to do some auditions for other events such as military bands, contest or such it would be ok to start getting either the Creston Sonata, Glazunov Concerto or the Ibert Concertino Da Camera under your fingers and keep them there.

Typically a freshman or Sophmore will focus on the standard lit and then open up a bit more later.

I guess my thoughts are, if you haven't played a recital yet you may want to consider getting as much performance time in on the standards before hitting the obscure. Because, as standards, they never go away.

Good luck! Play as much as possible to as many folks who will give you a critical listen before you do your pre-recital hearing. It helps.
 

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Re: learning music for future military band auditions, I agree of course with srcsax, and would also add Tableaux de Provence by Paule Maurice to the list. This was one of the required pieces for one of the more recent Marine band saxo auditions.

Make sure you pick a program that addresses your weaknesses and challenges your strengths. A priority I had since senior year of college was that I was not going to spend time learning music that I could not see being in my repertoire in the years to come. Something to keep in mind.

Angel
 

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Don't play the Maurice for your junior recital since you just played it for your sophomore recital :p

I say, some standards and one or two things no one else around your studio has done or worked on. I'd say play like the Heiden Sonata and the Boutry Divertimento. Then throw in some other stuff, maybe a Noda improvisation annnd then some Harry Potter duets ;)
 

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Stupid question perhaps, but I was wondering about all this terminology to do with American unis/colleges...how does it work? ie talking about junior/sophomore/freshman(I assume that's first year) recitals?

Do they all refer to uni?
 

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Yes, typically there are four years at a uni(which is usually wishful thinking). First year is freshman, second year is sophomore, third year is junior and fourth and final year is senior.

At any given school it is somewhat unusual for freshmen and sophomores to give a recital. Junior recital for an education degree and also a senior recital for a performance degree.
 

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Dannel said:
Yes, typically there are four years at a uni(which is usually wishful thinking). First year is freshman, second year is sophomore, third year is junior and fourth and final year is senior.

At any given school it is somewhat unusual for freshmen and sophomores to give a recital. Junior recital for an education degree and also a senior recital for a performance degree.
I see, thanks
 

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To make it even more confusing, American sportswriters use the terms "freshman" and "sophomore" interchangeably with rookie and second-year Major League Baseball players respectively.

Also, older, more sophisticated women often use the word "sophomoric" to describe a younger man's immature behavior. Just an aside....

Angel
 

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srcsax said:
If you decide to do some auditions for other events such as military bands, contest or such it would be ok to start getting either the Creston Sonata, Glazunov Concerto or the Ibert Concertino Da Camera under your fingers and keep them there.

Typically a freshman or Sophmore will focus on the standard lit and then open up a bit more later.

I guess my thoughts are, if you haven't played a recital yet you may want to consider getting as much performance time in on the standards before hitting the obscure. Because, as standards, they never go away.

Good luck! Play as much as possible to as many folks who will give you a critical listen before you do your pre-recital hearing. It helps.
Agreed. You might try playing mostly standards with one "different" piece in there. I always think it's cool to throw in something with some nice extended techniques, just to show that side of yourself. The Noda Improvisations are good for this, and have the bonus of being unaccompanied.
 

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Dannel said:
Don't play the Maurice for your junior recital since you just played it for your sophomore recital :p

I say, some standards and one or two things no one else around your studio has done or worked on. I'd say play like the Heiden Sonata and the Boutry Divertimento. Then throw in some other stuff, maybe a Noda improvisation annnd then some Harry Potter duets ;)
Just out of curiosity, do you two go to school together? You're both in Flagstaff...
 

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And I used to go to school with srcsax!.....

Angel
 
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