Sax on the Web Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've gotten pretty far with Sonny Rollins's solo on After Hours (Dizzy Gillespie). I was thinking of selling the transcription online for two dollars per purchaser. I'm pretty sure doing that by itself would be illegal. What would I have to do to make it legal?

Also, is two dollars a good price? This is my first transcription that I'll sell by the way. The chord progression is (in the tenor sax key) A7, D7, A7, A7, D7, D7, A7, A7, E7, D7, A7, E7, correct?

Last thing - if anyone's interested in looking over my transcription, fixing the small number of errors (I can learn to play it, but putting the rhythms on paper is a bit more challenging), and making it look nice (with a jazz font and everything, as I'm writing it by hand), let me know. I'll give them to you one chorus at a time.

Thanks.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member/Saxophonist Extraordinai
Joined
·
261 Posts
...hey, I still use jazz font. Oh well, I'm old anyway...smile

And there are legal issues that can come back to haunt you if your selling your transcriptions. I'm in the process of putting my 1st transcription book together and going about getting all the copyright issues together now. Good luck..,


---
I am here: http://maps.google.com/maps?ll=36.119439,-115.279286
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
What exactly do you have to do to get the copyright issues together? Also, since you have experience, would you be willing to help me out? I would just want you to check over my work after I'm finished it (a chorus at a time). The two pieces I'm working on are Sonny Rollins's solo on After Hours and Shake a Lady (Cannonball Adderley). I'm going to stick to more simple things until I have the time and experience for more advanced things (like Blue Trane Alternate Take - John Coltrane's solo).
 

·
The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum
Joined
·
27,650 Posts
You might want to check with Curtis Swift at saxsolos.com, that's his thing. Since that is his thing, I don't know how willing he would be to help you out, but if anybody should know, he should.

Jazz font (singular) sucks? What jazz font are you talking about? There are more than just one jazz font. In my own case, I hate to get a jazz or pop piece that's been printed with a strictly formal classic engraving font.
 

·
The most prolific Distinguished SOTW poster, Forum
Joined
·
27,650 Posts
I just mean something that isn't the normal classical font you were talking about. Also, thanks for the suggestion. I remember seeing his website a while ago.
I was responding to ericdano, not you jtyler. I use jazz fonts from Sibelius and I think they are very readable.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
13,023 Posts
I've gotten pretty far with Sonny Rollins's solo on After Hours (Dizzy Gillespie). ...

The chord progression is (in the tenor sax key) A7, D7, A7, A7, D7, D7, A7, A7, E7, D7, A7, E7, correct?
That's a straight 12-bar blues in A (concert G). You made me go listen to it on youtube. The piano is of course playing some substitutions and moving up and down but the underlying chord progression is the basic blues. The solos show you how original you can be while playing blues. I liked it. Thanks for making me look for it. :)

 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
13,023 Posts
There's no copyright on a standard 12-bar blues progression. Maybe if you sold the transcription broken up into separate choruses as part of an instructional thing about how to play a jazz solo on a basic blues ...

It would be fun. I'd buy it. :D
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,947 Posts
There's no copyright on a standard 12-bar blues progression.
You are correct, there is no copyright in the chord progression, but there would be a copyright in the notes played be the soloist.

The only legal way to publish a transcription of a solo is to get permission from the composer or publisher.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011-
Joined
·
1,036 Posts
You might want to check with Curtis Swift at saxsolos.com, that's his thing. Since that is his thing, I don't know how willing he would be to help you out, but if anybody should know, he should.

Jazz font (singular) sucks? What jazz font are you talking about? There are more than just one jazz font. In my own case, I hate to get a jazz or pop piece that's been printed with a strictly formal classic engraving font.
+1 for contacting Curtis, he's been doing it for years - I think I have 2 volumes of his transcriptions - great resource...
 

·
Moderator
Grafton alto | Martin Comm III tenor
Joined
·
28,947 Posts
Sonny Rollins isn't dead, but what would I do for those who are? Also, don't copyrights expire after 60 years or so?
It depends on the territory. What you need to do is contact the publishers to get permission, or if you believe a work is out of copyright due to the composer being dead over 75 years or whetaever,an organisation such as MCPS (maybe ASACP) to determine whether a work is out of coyright.

Remember, with an improvisation, the copyright in the music would usually belong to the composer or publisher of the original tune, not the improviser.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
13,023 Posts
Your solo doesn't, but the song does.
 

·
Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2011
Joined
·
13,023 Posts
Who is the composer of an improvised solo on, for instance, Autumn Leaves?
 

·
Discombobulated SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 201
Joined
·
9,739 Posts
I suspect this issue is particular to each country. Here's some info based on U.S. copyright law: http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/property/library/copyprimer.html. Concerning improvisation, it gives the surprising (surprising to me at least) example:

Anything unrecorded is not copyrightable, in as much as it is not "fixed;" for example, dances and improvisations themselves are not copyrightable: only visual recordings or written descriptions of them are. Say I go to a jazz concert and listen to a soloist's improvisation. If I have the musical equivalent of a photgraphic memory, I may be able to reproduce that improvised solo in my own concert on the following night. If that solo exists nowhere but my memory (i.e. the original concert was not recorded) I may play it with impunity, because it is not "fixed" and therefore not copyrightable. But, if the original concert was recorded (e.g. taped, videoed, transcribed on paper), even by an amateur, I am barred from playing my version of the solo. Even a bootleg recording (for which the recorder can be punished under section 1101 of the copyright act) qualifies for copyright protection: a work need not be formally published in order to be "fixed;" it need only be saved in a tangible form. 17 U.S.C. § 104.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top