Sax on the Web Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

Registered
Joined
139 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had recurring problems with my left elbow and both writs periodically, so I'm going through my hand position and technique to try to make sure that I'm as relaxed and naturally positioned as possible. One thing I noticed was that my left elbow is flared out some away from my body, and I've managed to adjust my palm keys and hand position to allow me to keep the elbow relaxed against my side, which I'm hoping will help.

One thing I'm still wondering about though is my left wrist positioning. In order to reach the upper stack, I need to bend my elbow slightly more than 90 degrees and bend my wrist slightly outward ("outward" meaning as if I lay my hand palm down on the table and bring my pinky towards the near side of my forearm). A certain amount of this seems kind of inevitable in order to compensate for the bent upward angle my forearm has to make in order to reach the keys, and I can't really lower my neckstrap much to help. I was just wondering if this is common or if anyone has any suggestions on how to gets your hands in a natural position that won't wreak havoc on your nerves/tendons. Thanks!
 

Distinguished SOTW Coffee Guru
Joined
41,663 Posts
I really think that it varies quite a bit between all of us because of the way we all differ in the way we are built and if you couple off of these individual variations to the variations present on so many differently engineered saxophones you have an almost infinite quantities of variables. From you moniker I suppose you have a Buescher horn, there is a big difference between the early ones and the later ones for example. I have tried several types of horns with different ergonomics especially among the vintage horns the differences can be crucial. Also among more modern horns, despite their similar looks, there is considerable variation.
Anyway, in my opinion one has to chose the horn that offers the best compromise between sound and playability. Certain technical aids can help ( you can have palm risers , move touches somewhat, have an extra (multiple) hook-ring soldered, moved or chose a type that allows a different position and balance)
So probably you should try to find one horn that allows you for a relaxed position of both arms and wrist which will enable you to have the best ergonomic impact on your body and enhance performance. But my opinion is that if you are playing a horn that you have to fight, you better find a different horn.
 

Registered
Joined
763 Posts
Play tenor or a bigger sax, or accordion. ;-)

A gyrotwister, power-ball or whatever they're called in your neck of the woods might be a good investment, along with stretching exercises.
 

Forum Contributor 2016, Distinguished SOTW Member
Joined
13,194 Posts
I have my elbow against my body. I bend my left wrist so that my pal is against the palm keys and my thumb is laying diagonally across the thumb rest and octave key. To push the octave key I just roll my thumb a little bit. Many people play with their wrist out so that thumb is horizontal and they have to move it up and down to get to the octave key which seems like way more work to me.
 

Premium Member
Joined
26,254 Posts
The more straight and natural the better. Many people play with their wrists cocked too high.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top