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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I recently purchased a new Yamaha 62II alto saxophone, and I'm having some trouble with the bell keys. I brought it home and noticed that the C# key lifted with a sort of "bounce", and that the large gap from the Bb to B (and vice versa) made making smooth transitions between the two notes very difficult. I then brought it in a few days later to have the C# key looked at along with to see if anything could be adjusted on the Bb/B keys. The man told me that he increased the spring tension on the C# key and adjusted the spatula keys a bit. After returning home and inspecting the instrument again, I noticed that when pressing the Bb key, the Bb and B keys do not completely cover their holes (very, very small gap on the Bb and a slightly larger gap on the B). This is also the same when pressing the low B key. When substantial strength is used, however, (and the right area of the key is pressed) the keys will cover the holes completely. I also noticed that when both the C#/Bb keys are pressed at the same time, smalls gaps open on the B and C# keys, should this be happening? Does anyone have any idea what could be the cause of these problems? Thank you!
 

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Are you laying it down on its side? It can bend the spatula keys. If they aren't set up spot on, the bells keys can cause problems. The little cork under the C# adjuster may be loose or something. If the screw is in too much it'll lift the B key. I think the adjustment is off a little - try backing off the screw quarter of a turn.

Occassionally the bow joint can shift. This is more a problem on cheaper Yamahas. 62s tend to be pretty solid - but it's worth having that checked if the above doesn't work.
 

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First adjust your playing styile, it sounds like you ride the C# lever as you roll B and Bb

That being said, the adjustment screw which exists on the Yamaha sax is out of adjustment, (not all saxes have this but yamaha does)

The small gap on B and Bb could be regulation or approach geometry (bent), its one of those, ""I need to see it to rectify it""
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
As it turns out, there was a leak in one of the trill keys that was causing the lower note to come out very difficulty. The leaks in the lower keys were too miniscule to cause much of an issue, but they still did need to be adjusted. Thank you for all of your help!
!
 

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If the low notes on saxes aren't working, it's not always the bell keys that are to blame. So many teachers say 'the low Bb isn't working because the lowest pad isn't closing properly' when low Bb can very often be played (but with some degree of difficulty) if the bell key pads don't close properly. If the low notes aren't working, then it's best to check the bell keys first, then check the rest of the instrument for leaks or poor regulation - a common problem being the G# key may not be regulated with the RH main action and opens slightly when the bell keys are used. If the bell notes bubble and there are no obvious pad leaks when checked with a leak light, then it's most likely to be a problem with the bore (which is a manufacturing problem) or the mouthpiece isn't suitable for the insrument or player.

When regulating the bell keys, make sure the low B key pad closes with slightly more pressure than the low Bb key pad as this will ensure they both close with normal finger pressure when using the low Bb touch only. You regulate the low B and Bb keys by bending the tab on the back of the low B touchpiece to get the balance right.

With multiple linked keys that close when operated by a single touchpiece (eg. low Bb on saxes, low A on baris, low B on bassoons, low C on bass clarinets, low Bb on oboes, low C on flutes, etc.), it's best to make the pads close progressively lighter as you go further down the instrument (or progressively heavier as you go up the instrument) to take into account the amount of torsion in the keys or key rods.
 
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