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Discussion Starter #1
Hi there,

I’ve been researching about lead exposure due to the fact that I realized that my Tenor has had quite a few re-solders done, including a neck pickup.

I assumed that saliva or just the water that drips from playing could wash some of it and expose the player’s skin.
Does anyone here have done any research about this? Any other specific threads?
What would be the proper way to get rid of them and replace them? With what?


While searching thw web I found this article, please check it out.

https://www.ceh.org/campaigns/legal...d-brass-mouthpieces-used-musical-instruments/


Here’s the list:

https://www.ceh.org/wp-content/uploads/Brass-Mouthpiece-List-3_5.png


All Best,


Zin
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Also, can you imagine how many people have been potentially affected by this? Players who basically chewed up the plating in old metal links, and other brands, Coltrane, Brecker?
 

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First of all, any solders done on your sax in the last 20 years should be with lead-free solder. I've been using 95-5 (tin-silver) for longer than that, and its better solder anyway. Second, to go in and de-solder and re-solder a sax is not only incredibly expensive (you can buy a new one for less), it is totally unwarranted. Solder doesn't just 'melt' in water or saliva, otherwise a sax would fall apart in a short while. I do not believe that anyone has ever had any injury from lead in the solder of a horn.
As for the mouthpieces, I guess you would go into apoplexy if you knew the lead percentage in the vintage mouthpieces still used by many.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi 1saxman, thank you for your answer and all the info. Well, I assume they were done recently but can’t really know, the material is dark grey and that’s why I thought it is lead. I was cleaning the neck with a mix of 40% vinegar 60% tap water and the solder of the octave key posts did wash off partly, you can see it now with less of the gray material and in the paper towel I used to dry it. I would assume that this happens because vinger is stronger than just water or saliva; would you still say it’s probably a tin-silver solder?
 

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You should be FAR more worried about what you encounter out on a daily basis. Such as the handles of shopping carts, who handles your food at restaurants, entering your pin number into a credit/debit card machine and touching the number pad, etc. Seriously dude, if you're this worried about solder on a freaking saxophone or plating on a mouthpiece more than what you potentially encounter in every day activity, I don't know what to tell you.
Personally, I'm not worried about either, but whatever floats your boat....
 

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This has been discussed. Almost all brass has a small content of lead...including the brass making your horn. Your plumbing has lead solder. The brass on most plumbing fixtures (faucets) has a much, much higher concentration of lead than a mouthpiece and you probably drink from it lately. Frankly, Id be more concerned about the heavy metals that remain in water supplies and toxins from plastic. Many kitchen and bathroom fixtures have up to 20 percent lead. A mpc...you are probably talking 5 percent or less.

Despite the article there is no documentation or research that suggests significant lead exposure is taking place in the use of a plated or non plated mouthpiece...at least I have looked and found none. You can worry if you please but frankly life is fatal. Id suggests its more dangerous to cross the street.
 

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'but frankly life is fatal'

You got that right - nobody gets out alive.

Zin; vinegar is a very useful acid that is very good for cleaning out a sax, mouthpiece or neck. If you had some oxide around a solder joint and it cleaned it up, that's pretty normal, but if you soaked the neck in it hoping to dissolve the solder, you should be prepared to wait a very long time. The tin-silver solder tends to stay bright. You probably have lead solder on the neck so just don't lick it or bite at it and you'll be fine.
 

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I would be far more concerned about bacteria living in reeds and mouthpiece.
 

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I heard that mpcs are coated to protect against lead poisoning. And when the coating wears off get it recoated. I certainly wouldn't stick naked lead in my mouth on a regular basis.
 

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I heard that mpcs are coated to protect against lead poisoning. And when the coating wears off get it recoated. I certainly wouldn't stick naked lead in my mouth on a regular basis.
Mouthpieces are plated to reduce wear to the facings and to make them shiny.

There is no “naked” lead in mouthpieces. Others and I have certainly laid out the scientific basis of lead in brass mouthpieces over a great many years.

The sky is not really falling either.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well, thank you all for the replies. I can stop worrying now and get back to practice. I’ll be sure to read now all that has been discussed before, thanks buddy lee. I will also try not to think about the problems of rubber haha as jgeriner pointed out.
Best

Zin
 

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Also, can you imagine how many people have been potentially affected by this?
I would be more concerned about asbestos from brake dust on your daily commute. Or GMO foods. For that matter sit down and make a list of all the chemicals you’re in contact with daily. Starting with toothpaste.
 

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Mouthpieces are plated to reduce wear to the facings and to make them shiny.

There is no “naked” lead in mouthpieces. Others and I have certainly laid out the scientific basis of lead in brass mouthpieces over a great many years.

The sky is not really falling either.
There are, or were, dangerous metal contents(maybe not lead) in sax mouthpieces, and unharmful metallic coatings were applied to prevent poisoning, because some folks are prone to, are allergic to certain metals.

Thanks for your invaluable information. You are a credit to SOTW and to saxophone players everywhere.
 

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There are, or were, dangerous metal contents(maybe not lead) in sax mouthpieces, and unharmful metallic coatings were applied to prevent poisoning.

Thanks for your invaluable information. You are a credit to SOTW and to saxophone players everywhere.
Is this part of your “... baffle ‘em with bullsh*t” campaign?

Please stick to the facts when people are discussing health issues.
 
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