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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I could use some help with categorising a Yanagisawa tenor I bought just recently. The serial is 155***, which would make it a relatively "young" T-800/T-880, but after looking at all the pictures I could find of those saxes, I don't think it belongs in that group. It looks a lot more like a T-900. But the serial simply doesn't fit. Any suggestions as to how to get more accurate information?

Meanwhile, I'll put up some images as soon as I can find a decent camera...

M.

P.S. Maybe this should be moved to the "Yanagisawa" section - sorry about the possible misplacement...
 

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That definitely should be an 800 series .

The model number(800/880) should be stamped above the serial number .

Is the neck 8va key underslung or the standard type ?

Does it have the Yani tuning fork emblem on the bell ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here are some pictures: http://www.box.net/shared/91fsftao8g (I'll add more/better ones as soon as there's a decent camera available).

No underslung octave key, standard solution. No 880, then, if what I found is correct.

The fork emblem is on the bell, engraved above the name - not on some kind of small badge.

I've found more resemblance with T-900 models: plastic thumb hook, plastic thumb rest, no "Elimona" engraving (but no "900", either). Anyhow, you can see the serial on some of the pics.

And at least in one case, some guy stated that his "147***" tenor was a T-900. But I don't know if this kind of posting can be trusted. It's not in keeping with any of the lists I was able to dig up.

M.
 

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I'm guessing that was a non-export model that you have which is why it doesn't
have a model number stamp above the serial number .

My 880 (which was made right at the end of the run) tenor had the plastic thumbhook

It looks to me to be a T800; domestic issue .
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Okay, thanks a lot for your insights! :) Sounds pretty reasonable to me.

However, the pics that I found show double-armed bell and/or C keys (see here), so while I'm very inclined to follow your analysis, I'm not entirely sure. So I'll stay put (besides, investigating this turns out to be really interesting) - does someone have to offer some pictures of late T-800/early T-900 saxes?

M.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Is this sax labelled in the wrong way, then?

http://woodwindforum.com/wp-content/gallery/yani-t-800/img_6813.jpg

I really only ask out of curiosity - I can very well live with a T-800, I'm just trying to make sure.

The point is that some parts of the sax I have look exactly like pictures of the T-901 I find - but that can't be... The neck receiver looks exactly like the T-901's, whereas the one of the T-800 seems to be considerably straighter... It's really strange. But then, maybe I'm looking at pictures of old issues while I own a newer one? Did they make changes while the series was still running?

M.
 

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The [ser.no range] that your tenor's in would dictate that they were leaving the double-armed
keys to the 880 model and dropping it from the 800 .

That is an earlier version T800

They didn't start with the underslung neck 8va keys until the 80's and the ser.# on
that tenor indicates a 1978 date of manufacture.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ah, okay, I see. It's not surprising that they rework their models if they have a more-than-ten-years run on them.

Thanks again - this seems to make things pretty clear now.

M.
 

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The [ser.no range] that your tenor's in would dictate that they were leaving the double-armed
keys to the 880 model and dropping it from the 800 .

That is an earlier version T800

They didn't start with the underslung neck 8va keys until the 80's and the ser.# on
that tenor indicates a 1978 date of manufacture.
I'm not allowed to edit my posts anymore so .. a slight correction :
that was a 1979 T800 .
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
And I can confirm your findings now. Just found some pictures of a T-800 from 1981. It's - well, more or less, of course, but closely enough - the same horn. Besides, I seem to have been pretty lucky about the price :)

M.
 

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Congrats on your Yani - great saxes! One quirk about Yanagisawa is that they were not very uniform in their sax construction (especially in their earlier years) . . . except that they were all good. If you search (as you have) photos of Yani's, you will find variations in double-arms and octave configurations. They don't always match what the model is known for. It would be more frustrating if they weren't so good.
 

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The serial# of your horn indicates '89 production (Lars K.)
It sports post construction, steel springs and nylon screw in felt bumper holders.
Likely a late T-800.

fwiw, I have a '78 Yani/Martin with steel springs also but it has ribbed constuction,
double arms on the bell and bow keys and metal screw in bumpers.

It does appear, as Tryp stated,that these features were eventually dropped from the 800 series.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Craig:

It's possible - but there are those who state that the stainless steel springs that are mentioned in the woodwind forum article as typical for the T-500 were used on the T-800, too. It definitely has those, so I'm not sure what to believe now. Anyhow, I'm very satisfied with the sound of the horn (I'll have to work on the action a bit, though), so I don't mind much which model it might be - I just want to find out, so I'll certainly investigate further - thanks a lot for sharing your information! I'll have my favourite dealer look into it as well - he might be able to talk to Yanagisawa more or less directly.

As far as I can tell and was able to find out by asking the previous owner, the saxophone was bought and has been used in Switzerland exclusively for about 20 years - matching the production date the serial number indicates. I don't have any idea how well Yanagisawa as a brand was established in Switzerland in the mid-80s. Judging from the price on the original bill (that, alas, doesn't mention a model - nor an exact date except the year 1989), I'd say it's not an entry level horn. But then, no Yani seems to be (at least to me), and Swiss prices tend to be off on the far side of expensive...

Be it as it may - if it's a T-500, I'll be happy to have one of those :) In the meantime, I'll stick to the fact that I have seen T-800 pictures that match my horn completely (down to key shape...). I'll keep you posted, though - if any new information comes up, I'll let you know.

M.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Okay, to put more or less an end to this: I read what I could find here and elsewhere and it appears that CraigAB was right: It's a T-500.

The decisive information was in this post.

Sorry for jumping back and forth - but in the end, it's the result that counts (I hope).

M.
 

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I would say is a T-800. The T-500 did not have the tilting mechanism on the low Bb key. Also the T-500 would have had rectangular shaped high F# key rather than curved.

Basically, the T-800 was the equivalent to the T-900 and cuurent T-901. Ie a cheaper version of the T-880 minus the underslung octave key, ribbed construction and pearls on Front F, G# and side F# keys.

Mind you, Yanagisawa sometimes mixed up the keywork when they were crossing over to new models. I have a S880 soprano (stamped 880) on which some of the keywork is clearly from the S990 which came after.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Did the T-800 use stainless steel springs? I thought I had it down when I read the post I mentioned, but now I'm back several squares again - the sax has the tilting mechanism and the curved F# key...

I seem to be making a fool out of myself...

M.
 

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Also, as someone else noted, the serial number indicates the horn was made in 1989. That's a long time after they supposedly stopped making the T-500 (1984). Although the T-500 I used to have was bought brand new in 1986, so these dates should be regarded as approximate only . . .

There ain't no shame in stainless steel springs. At least they won't rust!
 
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