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So, I ended up buying this beauty , in great shape, it plays as well as my Eastake. Absolutely no tuning issues.

Same ballsy voice get warm and soft at will. But I have to say the Eastlake has a different “ vibe” , which I prefer.

Great case (better than the one of earlier models) perfect fit no play at all.

The bonus high F# is very welcome.

The pearl touches are concave ( whereas the Eastlake were flat), the left hand palm keys are mounted on a rib construction , nowhere else on the the new horn (the old horn didn’t have that).
The thumbrest is certainly nickel silver and very likely the rest of the mechanics under a coat of golden lacquer are nickel silver too (as the Eastlake is), but there is no way for me to tell until they will scratch

The necks are interchangeable, at least in terms of fitting but there is a small problem since the Super 20 VI has a “ leader” for the octave prong, if I put a Silever neck from the Eastlake on its octave mechanism would be permanently open.

The horn was perfectly repadded ad adjusted with only minor signs of use.

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Distinguished SOTW Member, Forum Contributor 2012
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Wow, it's a beauty! Glad it worked out for you!

I have an Eastlake neck that will fit my USA, so it must be just the slightest of differences.
 

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thanks!
 

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I'm gonna go out on a limb and say that people who believe their USA Kings have brazed tone holes are mistaken. We have a poster here quoting from a late '60s catalog that brags about drawn tone holes. My 2416 definitely has drawn tone holes--it's an 871XXX by the way, apparently later than any horn we're talking about on this thread.
Wow, it's a beauty! Glad it worked out for you!

I have an Eastlake neck that will fit my USA, so it must be just the slightest of differences.

I have retried and they do fit (with a small caveat that you can now read above^)
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According to the company that sold this they belong to a Batch sold by UMI and made in Nogales with parts left from the Eastlake production.

I don’t know how much of this story is based on first hand accounts but the late Super 20 I have here is a very good horn SN 788XXX . I see at least 3 other saxophones for sale (one a Silversonic) in the NL of this late series, they all look identical and may have been for years in someones stockroom since they are all almost pristine .

Mine is a very good horn

I am selling it but if I don’t get the right price I won’t be sad to keep it.

maybe more information on these horns could be acquired by someone in touch with Skåne-Gripen Bernhard Muskantor






“....
The man who brought all of these names together in 1985 was Bernhard Muskantor, who led the effort that bought the C.G. Conn, King and Armstrong groups and merged them together to form United Musical Instruments.

“All of these companies had special places in history of the instruments they had made,” says Muskantor, UMI’s chairman. “These brands still have force – musicians still look for them and their basic designs still hold true for instruments today. The legacy of those brand names was the best thing UMI had going for itself in the beginning.”

But the new company wasn’t content to rest on the laurels of these time-honored brands. “Since 1985,” Breske says, “UMI has invested millions of dollars in technology and expansion to meet the demands of top musicians. Today’s musicians want to design an instrument to meet their own needs – not just buy one off the shelf. The question for us is: How custom can we be while providing instruments to as many people as possible?”

From Musician to Management
In developing new ways to make traditional instruments, UMI has one distinct advantage: most of the management staff members are musicians.

“Many of us are musicians and former music educators, so we have a natural affinity for our products,” says Breske. “We knew these brand names because some of us studied these instruments since we were young. Also, most of our salesmen are musicians; many of them are former band directors, as well.”

The musician orientation gives UMI several advantages in developing new instruments. First, it provides the staff with a special understanding of what professional musicians are looking for in an instrument. They can talk of music with ease and do so with such clientele as members of major worldwide symphonies, Hollywood-based recording artists, New York-based studio musicians and Paris-based educators/studio musicians, among others. Second, the research and development portion of the job comes naturally to the research and development staff, because many of these engineers also have performance experience.

UMI has three manufacturing facilities. One is at the corporate headquarters in Elkhart, which turns out flutes, piccolos, double-reeds and stringed instruments, and which is home to the company’s accessory warehouse. Another manufacturing center is in Eastlake, Ohio, which produces brass instruments and which, after a couple of expansions, is now the largest single brass instrument manufacturing facility in North America. The third center, in Nogales, Ariz., makes clarinets and saxophones.

....."
 

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by the way , just to show that it is absolutely false that late Super 20 had pulled toneholes , this is the Super 20 above, all the toneholes are soldered on (brazed if you wish)


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