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I know I've been asking a bunch of questions... this is the last one... People often complain about the intonation of the Mark VI's but then rave about earlier horns from the '20s and '30s. Don't those horns have intonation problems as well, compared to modern Japanese horns? Is the Mark VI really any worse than these earlier horns?
 

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I’ve owned three MKVI sopranos over time. My first VI was not quite as good as the two I now own.

My current VI’s have as good intonation as any moden soprano I’ve owned (Selmer, Yamaha, Yanagisawa, Rampone). I’ve also owned several vintage sopranos (Conns, Bueschers, Martin, and King) and they were OK, intonation-wise but not as good as my VI’s.

Beware of blanket statements. It would be inaccurate to generalize about any brand or model. Small samplings like mine are not indicative of the whole soprano universe. DAVE
 

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TENOR, soprano, alto, baritone
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If you end up with a soprano with intonation problems, you might consider having a professional look it over and see if 'voicing' (adjusting key heights for intonation) and a few other tricks can put it right. Definitely better than losing a pile of money on it. For the price of a good MK VI soprano, I would prefer a Sterling silver Yanagisawa.
Bottom line, any soprano sax is a little beast that has to be tamed and this includes learning to play it in tune as well as finding the mouthpiece that helps you do that and have the sound you're looking for - its all part of the game.
 

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Well, I tell you, my Buescher True Tone has way better intonation than I do.

I think that by and large the suggestion of poor intonation on older sopranos is a canard left over from the days when hardly anyone played soprano; and when tenor or alto players picked up an old soprano with bad pads, misadjusted, and played it with an alto or tenor embouchure and lousy reeds and couldn't get it in tune right away, they declared "all these old sopranos play out of tune".

I remember the fountains of misinformation that were floating around in the 70s, and I've pointed some of this stuff out here. Not all of the misinformation has yet been dissipated.
 

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I'll tell you that my 1967 Selmer Mark VI Soprano plays really nice and in tune! Not so sure if the Mark Vi intonation "Stereotype" is really true. My other soprano "Yamaha Custom Z" black soprano is what I consider "Locked In" in tune. Locked in meaning......You can sleep walk while playing and still play spot on.....in tune. My Keilwerth "Grover" Soprano plays in tune as well and am very happy about that. I would say that not many players put the time in playing soprano and hence the problem. The soprano in my opinion is one needy mofo and requires your full attention. Also a well balanced mouthpiece is vital for the possibility of obtaining perfect intonation on any soprano. And remember .......It's the Indian......and most likely not the Arrow!
 

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csacwp,

There is a reason why I am having to move your multiple threads about this topic into another sub forum. You are posting it in the wrong one.

When a query is brand specific (regardless of the ancillary discussion topic), and doesn't have a designated sub forum otherwise such as necks, pads, maintenance etc, it goes into the maker assigned sub forum.

I've moved this into the appropriate Selmer-Paris area.
 
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