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Discussion Starter #1
So I have this Kohlert tenor I posted about a while ago. http://forum.saxontheweb.net/showthread.php?154335-So-what-model-Kohlert-is-this-exactly

I have never seen a Kohlert '57. 58 or 59 so I can only assume that mine is pretty similar still.

Some of the pads are starting to tear along the sides and the horn has several leaks, however it still plays pretty well.

It has some dents and dings, nothing major, but th eusual abuse. It had some solder work done whcih seems to be done really well. The gold lacquer is scratched and around the solder work is turning red.

The LH lower pantguard is gone and so are the posts, the brass has actually slightly lifted where the posts where so that tells me the guard was ripped straight off.

Although I have always loved vintage horns, I sometimes yearn for a modern, trouble free sax, problem is they are pricey. There are no stores in my area that sell saxophones so I can't even go out and try any. I have always played older horns which always have some sort of issue going on and I want something I know plays as it should so I can focus on my tone and not worry about the instrument.

What would you guys do in my position? Save the horn? Clean it up, give it new pads, corks and felt or go for a new horn.

How do you Kohlert owners rate the horn as opposed to a more modern horn?
 

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I had a Kohlert Winnenden which I played on and off for about 2 years. Soundwise, this tenor was a monster player- a huge, rich tone throughout all registers. However, I could never completely feel comfortable with the ergonomics. Specifically the left hand pinky cluster and the right hand side keys. So I wound up selling the horn.
 

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Several points here.

1. Depending on where you plan to go on tenor sax, it may be time to upgrade. If you want new or different tenor, then it may be time to get one.

2. The cost of a repad for that sax is probably just slightly below the total value of the sax. But that would give you a fresh well regulated horn. If you want to keep and play the Kohlert, that could be money well spent.

3. You can buy all the supplies you need to replace the pads yourself from MusicMedic.com. And it's fairly cheap. You can most likely get everything for a complete repad for less than $100 USD. And this Kohlert might be a great sax to try this on.

4. The pantguard is one of least important parts of a saxophone. Don't worry about it.

5. In an earlier post, I told someone that they could probably fight off a barbarian horde using a Kohlet tenor. Those things were made like anvils. If you need a beater sax as a backup or as something to play in rough venues, the Kohler is a pretty good choice.

6. If you decide to buy a new tenor and sell the Kohler, just sell it like it is. You will likely lose money if you fix it and then sell it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Pumseig, I see what you mean. I don't have too much of an issue with the key positions, only when I switch between tenors but that's pretty normal I guess.

Enviroguy you have very good points there. I might do a repad myself as I am currently doing my baritone and is going quite well. I wish I could try out some other horns just to get a feel for them though, I might really love this Kohlert after doing so! : )
 

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Hi again Doc...if you are happy with the ergonomics it might be a good exercise to do the repad yourself. Curt has some great how-to articles on the Music Medic site.
It might end up being a pretty good horn, if it ends up playing like my one from a few years earlier then you can probably stop looking for another horn.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi again Doc...if you are happy with the ergonomics it might be a good exercise to do the repad yourself. Curt has some great how-to articles on the Music Medic site.
It might end up being a pretty good horn, if it ends up playing like my one from a few years earlier then you can probably stop looking for another horn.
Hey Nevile,

I think I will do a repad since the investment will be pretty low as long as I do it myself. The horn does exhibit some nice tones even with all the leaks it has. It literally leaks on every single pad, it's amazing. Adjusting the keywork will be more of a challenge. One of the reasons I am considering a newer horn is that they feel even throughout so I will have to sit down with the horn, some felt and some glue!
 

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Hi Doc, not sure what you refer to by "feel even", but definately a new horn is always nice.
I just had the thumb-hook changed on mine to a modern one. As well as being infinitely more comfortable on my thumb, by mounting the base in the same spot (to minimise lacquer loss) this brings the hook up higher, more in line with the side Bb and makes it much easier to get around for someone used to Selmer ergos.
The left hand pinky stack is really the only other issue, seems not enough leverage really...I have managed to lighten the G# but the bell keys are probably always gonna be a bit heavier and I have to have the G# actuation switched off the C# or it is just too stiff.
My horn is pretty much as set up from the factory, it doesn't seem to have been played at all really so it feels like new with those sharp pearls. I like the sound and the resistance to blow is great with the German pads...I wonder how much difference it would make having some with reflectors...wouldn't want to wreck it!
 

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Hi Doc, not sure what you refer to by "feel even", but definately a new horn is always nice.
I just had the thumb-hook changed on mine to a modern one. As well as being infinitely more comfortable on my thumb, by mounting the base in the same spot (to minimise lacquer loss) this brings the hook up higher, more in line with the side Bb and makes it much easier to get around for someone used to Selmer ergos.
The left hand pinky stack is really the only other issue, seems not enough leverage really...I have managed to lighten the G# but the bell keys are probably always gonna be a bit heavier and I have to have the G# actuation switched off the C# or it is just too stiff.
My horn is pretty much as set up from the factory, it doesn't seem to have been played at all really so it feels like new with those sharp pearls. I like the sound and the resistance to blow is great with the German pads...I wonder how much difference it would make having some with reflectors...wouldn't want to wreck it!
Oh I meant the feel of the keywork. These older horns feel inconsistent to me. Just as you said, the left pinky stack feels a bit stiff and with the newer horns I feel that all keys have the same resistance giving them a more even feel. I know a good tech can probably setup an old horn to play like a newer one but I don't even know any techs around here!

I'm just starting to learn to really relax my embouchure which is great, but I really need to start relaxing my hands as well. I don't think I have a problem with the thumb hook but I do push a lot with my thumbs and both get really sore after a minute or two. Come to think of it, I do the same on guitar....
 
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