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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a bent soprano Kohlert. It is real easy to play. It is marked with "1" which would mean it is from 1901. I wonder why there are no keys for high E and F on the left hand side.
Thina, Stockholm
right side Kohlert soprano (640x480) (2).jpg Number 1 (480x640).jpg Mouthpiece Kohlert (640x480).jpg Left side kohlert soprano (640x480).jpg Engraving Kohlert soprano (640x480).jpg D D# keys (480x640).jpg Case inside (640x480).jpg Case 2 (640x480).jpg
 

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I'm not an expert, but I higly doubt it is a 1901 saxophone, seems more recent than that.

Some old horns don't have the full range of the sax, so it may be because of that. Could it be a sopranino instead of a curved soprano?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm not an expert, but I higly doubt it is a 1901 saxophone, seems more recent than that.

Some old horns don't have the full range of the sax, so it may be because of that. Could it be a sopranino instead of a curved soprano?
Hi, it is definitely a soprano, very well preserved, original case and mouthpiece. The number, "1" should be from 1901, according to lists I have found online. You can see the number in the photo.
 

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This is certainly not a 1901 saxophone. That number one is not the serial number. It is, at best, a late ’20 but more probably late ’30 saxophone

We have had an almost identical post long ago where someone had a Kohlert curved soprano with the number 2 on it

Yes it is a Soprano (a sopranino would have not had such a pronounced curved neck ) and it is in beautiful state, yet it only stretches to Eb which some people would find less desirable than a saxophone with high F (and maybe even a front F which most European and Japanese saxophones didn’t acquire until the late ’60)
 

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Probably from around 1930, perhaps a bit earlier given the lack of high E/F, although interesting because it has same-side bellkeys which usually indicate post-1920's.
But not 1901 because the key touches on pinky table and spats would not have looked like that, and bellkeys would certainly not have been on same side of bell. Plus it is engraved VKS....

Beautiful horn, I sold one like this a couple of years ago. It was not unusual for older vintage sopranos, both straight and curved, to be keyed only up to high Eb (Baritones were like this, too). If you look on eBay at old sopranos you will likely find some like this....2 side keys, 2 LH palmkeys.
 

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not unusual by by that time this was produced both Buescher and Conn had high F models which would be, of course, preferred by buyers. In my neck of the woods baritones to Eb are very difficult to sell and sopranos to high Eb are sold more but at a very different level than a high F one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Probably from around 1930, perhaps a bit earlier given the lack of high E/F, although interesting because it has same-side bellkeys which usually indicate post-1920's.
But not 1901 because the key touches on pinky table and spats would not have looked like that, and bellkeys would certainly not have been on same side of bell. Plus it is engraved VKS....

Beautiful horn, I sold one like this a couple of years ago. It was not unusual for older vintage sopranos, both straight and curved, to be keyed only up to high Eb (Baritones were like this, too). If you look on eBay at old sopranos you will likely find some like this....2 side keys, 2 LH palmkeys.
Thanks for your reply! Very helpful. I bought this in an antique store in Stockholm. It is so easy to play! Have no idea how much it is worth. I usually play a Buescher alto 1929 which is great.
 

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Thanks for your reply! Very helpful. I bought this in an antique store in Stockholm. It is so easy to play! Have no idea how much it is worth. I usually play a Buescher alto 1929 which is great.
In the US worth around $750usd or so. If it were keyed up to F it would be worth double. But yes, the one I refurbished was a very sweet playing instrument.
 

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the engraving on your lovely little soprano is identical to that of my Kohlert alto. My alto has no serial number. I was told Kohlert did not introduce serial numbers until after 1926 which bore a name "Modell 1926" engraved into bell. This modell 1926 is for all intents and purposes identical to mine which would place my horns vintage at early 1920s. Attached image of the Modell 1926 for your reference. Also added is my own without model designation or serial number.
 

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In the 20s and 30s, the pitch standards were in flux, so you might figure out how the horn is pitched before you invest a lot of money restoring it. You can read about the evolution of pitch standards on Wikipedia.
 

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In the 20s and 30s, the pitch standards were in flux, so you might figure out how the horn is pitched before you invest a lot of money restoring it. You can read about the evolution of pitch standards on Wikipedia.
It certainly doesn't look like it needs a lot of restoration. At least from the pictures, the pads look great, as does the overall finish of the horn. The high F key wasn't standard on sops until mid 1920s and the lack of it still doesn't mean it was before 1930. It's a gorgeous-looking instrument!

And yes, it might be worth checking the pitch but it's a soprano so it is really easy to compensate

Be very careful with the bent key guard, either leave it as is or have a professional look whether they can straighten it back out.
 
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