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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Started listening to Skerik again after forgetting about him for a decade. He's funky but weird and uses a lot of effects, processing and vocalists sometimes. Wish he had some straiter albums.

Kirk Whalum seems good but I can't get past the vocalists, smoothness and incessant soprano.

Just found Pee Wee Ellis. Didn't realize he was still making albums in the 2000s. Truthfully all I ever heard about from everyone from that gen was Maceo, Maceo, Maceo... I don't want to hear vocals, at all. So Maceo is completely out. And Pee Wee is a better player anyway. Funny no one ever mentioned him in previous posts...

Still holding for some good post 2000 (even better post 2010 if there are any) funk tenor players that don't constantly play with vocalists , RnB, hip hop, smooth, etc...
 

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I, personally, think Kirk Whalum is excellent, and he also hires some of the best musicians in the world for his touring band! Extremely funky and soulful musician. He does a great job bridging jazz, funk/soul/RnB, and Gospel music in a very genuine way.

Quamon Fowler of Fort Worth, TX is similarly great at all that, but he's a bit more on the "jazz" side of things... and a truly beautiful gift to the world of jazz saxophone.

Keith Anderson, of Dallas, is probably my very favorite funk-oriented saxophonist on earth at the moment. For tone, time, and feel, you'd be hard-pressed to find a better role model in the history of the instrument. You can hear him on recordings and live bootlegs with Roy Hargrove, Marcus Miller, and Prince.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I, personally, think Kirk Whalum is excellent, and he also hires some of the best musicians in the world for his touring band! Extremely funky and soulful musician. He does a great job bridging jazz, funk/soul/RnB, and Gospel music in a very genuine way.

Quamon Fowler of Fort Worth, TX is similarly great at all that, but he's a bit more on the "jazz" side of things... and a truly beautiful gift to the world of jazz saxophone.

Keith Anderson, of Dallas, is probably my very favorite funk-oriented saxophonist on earth at the moment. For tone, time, and feel, you'd be hard-pressed to find a better role model in the history of the instrument. You can hear him on recordings and live bootlegs with Roy Hargrove, Marcus Miller, and Prince.
Yes, thats kinda why I mentioned him. I need to give him another try. Its just hard for me to get past the smooth vibes, vocalists and incessant soprano. Maybe you could recommend and album of his that has none of the above?
 

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Keilwerth saxes (S/A/T), Selmer clarinets (S/B), Altus Azumi flute
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Jeff Coffin?

He obviously sometimes records (and tours) with vocalists, but usually not on his own stuff. He's pretty funky. While he sometimes uses effects, it's pretty sparingly (you're more likely to get him on multiple instruments) and there's no trace of that R&B smoothness to his sound. Finally, he just released a record last month (Between Dreaming and Joy) that's almost all funk. That should be recent enough for you, no?
 

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Also, if you want to hear Maceo without any vocals, check out the album "Mo' Roots" (and skip track 5, which is the only one with any vocals). It's from 1991, but I think he sounds great on it.
It's got one of my favorite versions of "The Chicken" on it (second only to the one on Jaco's "The Birthday Concert" album, of course), and Pee Wee plays on it (though I personally find Maceo's playing to be much funkier and more rhythmically "locked in").
 

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Kirk Whalum seems to privilege his sideman/session profile. I discovered him on a Larry Carlton album, and later on with Whitney Houston. Nothing wrong with that. Plas Johnson, Tom Scott, Michael Brecker or Dan Higgins are great examples who do/did the same, at least during a part of their career.
Reading through interviews and biographies, it certainly has a lot to do with lifestyle choices.
As a direct consequence, there aren't many albums or concerts out there featuring KW as a main soloist.
I'd also appreciate to hear more of him.
 

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Use to go hear Everette Harp play often in the late 80s in Houston. Was able to chat with him a few times. I asked him once who was a big influence on his playing and he told me David Sanborn.
Met Kirk once at a jazz festival in down town Houston.
Both are great performers. Very friendly, very likable 😎
Many years ago when they were still local Houston musicians unknown to the world Kirks on record stating that Everette was the one musician that he wished he could play like.
 

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Nothing wrong with smooth. A good tune is a good tune and a great player is just that. I didn't know much about Kirk Whalum at all until I had to learn a pop tune for a group I played with called Can We Talk. Rather than learn the pop version, I took my cues from Whalum's instrumental. Then when the tune is called for a show, our vocalist froze, forgetting the lyrics. Fine by me, I just jumped in and played the verse ala Whalum. Great changes too, for soloing. Almost sorry I quit the group...

 

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I guess this thread evolved to be more about funk styles, so Skerik not really fitting the discussion. Funk is great too, though to me blending it with other styles like jazz-funk and gospel-funk makes it more interesting. To me Brecker and Sanborn were the ultimate funk players. Check out Slick Stuff and Grease Piece on the Brecker Brothers Back to Back album.
 

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I guess this thread evolved to be more about funk styles, so Skerik not really fitting the discussion.
Have you checked out the videos with the True Loves? For sure funk/soul, and a great ensemble. Skerik appears to have a pretty wide range of abilities, even if for his own band, Primus, etc. he's doing more experimental stuff.
 

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Karl Denson doesn’t get a lot of mention on the forum but he’s great and still very active touring and releasing new material. His own thing: KDTU and the Grey Boy AllStars are both nearly all instrumental, and he’s been touring with the Stones on their last run.

also, just put on Spotify and let it run on a tune you like. As I mentioned on your other thread with nearly the same title and scope of discussion: there’s tons of funky instrumental music out there that’s sax/ horn heavy, there just isn’t a big market for “name” players now like before.
 
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