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:treble: Does anyone know what sort of material was originally used on the low C# key fork mechanism?

Mine has/had some sort of rubber tubing on the post inside both forks which was adding friction and binding. I removed the tube on one of the posts and and while it added some slop to the mechanism it greatly improved the action; with both tubes removed the action became very fluid but it affects the how far the pad cup opens and makes the LH pinky table uneven.

It seems the post would benefit from a tight fitting or glued on delrin bearing with the fork lined w/ teflon tape.

Here are some pics -

thanks!

View attachment 241690

View attachment 241692

View attachment 241694
 

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not really answering the question, but given that you introduced slack in the keywork, a possible cheap fix is to use teflon tubing (<10USD fix from amazon e.g ) which would be almost frictionless (since it is teflon) and somewhat match up with the while rollers you have on low B and low Bb on the picture. benefit is no lubrication needed for its lifetime...
 

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I agree with moesenl. I use teflon tubing a lot in my saxophone repair especially for those "saddle and rod" joints as are found on a lot of side keys. Many instruments come from the factory with either rubber or silicone tubing installed which has the advantage of being quiet, but introduces a lot of friction. I have found that using teflon will allow the sides to be bent together for a tighter fit to eliminate the noise, and still allow freedom of movement for the joint. Some techs use teflon tube that they glue on. I prefer to stock several diameters so I can get a tight "friction" fit that needs no adhesive. I see no real advantage in using both delrin and teflon.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I agree with moesenl. I use teflon tubing a lot in my saxophone repair especially for those "saddle and rod" joints as are found on a lot of side keys. Many instruments come from the factory with either rubber or silicone tubing installed which has the advantage of being quiet, but introduces a lot of friction. I have found that using teflon will allow the sides to be bent together for a tighter fit to eliminate the noise, and still allow freedom of movement for the joint. Some techs use teflon tube that they glue on. I prefer to stock several diameters so I can get a tight "friction" fit that needs no adhesive. I see no real advantage in using both delrin and teflon.
Thanks for the reply. I'll order some. Also, I just discovered something called "Flourostore" that is supposed to be even more slippery than teflon.

I'm also debating getting a full re-pad and trying to avoid the temptation to do it myself. ;-) .

In the mean time I'll try out the teflon tubing.
 
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